AT&T logo in New York. Photo: Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

Telecom giants AT&T and Verizon are both pursuing a strategy that marries content and distribution. But they are taking two different approaches and, so far, seeing radically different results.

Verizon admitted Tuesday that its media arm, Oath — which consists of AOL, HuffPost, Yahoo and other digital brands — is struggling to drive revenue. Meanwhile, AT&T said Wednesday that WarnerMedia, its media division that was formerly called Time Warner, is flourishing.

Why it matters: Oath is driven by digital ad income, whereas WarnerMedia is driven by revenue from streaming subscriptions, its studio business and its digitally-sold television ads business. The digital ad business continues to be a tough marketplace for media companies competing with tech giants like Google and Facebook, whereas those tech giants have yet to dominate subscription streaming, movies, and digitally-sold TV ads.

What they're saying:

  • Verizon conceded in its earnings press release that it expects Oath revenues "to be relatively flat" in the near-term and "does not expect to meet the previous target of $10 billion in Oath revenues by 2020." Oath was down 6.9% in revenue year over year.
  • AT&T CFO John Stephens told investors on a call Wednesday that higher subscription revenues at HBO and Turner as well as increased TV licensing revenues at Warner Bros. helped drive WarnerMedia's success. WarnerMedia's revenue was up 6.5% year over year.

Between the lines: While this was only the first full quarter of earnings reported for WarnerMedia under its new parent company, all signs point to optimism from investors.

  • Oath, on the other, hand, is facing a brutal outlook from both investors and media experts. Many, including Former Yahoo CFO Ken Goldman, have suggested that Verizon should spin off Oath.
  • The company has lost the majority of its top executives since it was acquired last year, including CEO Tim Armstrong. As a result, Verizon says it's focusing its future investments on building out its national 5G network.

Bottom line: Even in an Internet age, TV content still has value, regardless of which screens are used to view it. On the other hand, Internet media continues to be a tough sale, even when you own the pipe.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 43 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 a.m. ET: 18,543,662 — Total deaths: 700,714 — Total recoveries — 11,143,031Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 a.m. ET: 4,771,236 — Total deaths: 156,807 — Total recoveries: 1,528,979 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. States: New York City health commissioner resigns in protest of De Blasio's coronavirus response — Local governments go to war over schools.
  4. Public health: 59% of Americans support nationwide 2-week stay-at-home order in NPR poll.
  5. Politics: Trump's national security adviser returns to work after coronavirus recovery Republicans push to expand small business loan program.
  6. Sports: Indy 500 to be held without fansRafael Nadal opts out of U.S. Open.
Updated 46 mins ago - World

Azar to lead delegation to Taiwan in first high-level U.S. visit in decades

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar during a June briefing in Washington, DC. Photo: Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced Tuesday night he will lead a delegation to Taiwan "in the coming days."

Why it matters: It's the highest-level visit by a U.S. cabinet official to Taiwan since 1979. Azar is also the first U.S. Cabinet member to visit the island state in six years. The visit has angered China, which views Taiwan as part of its territory. Chinese officials accused the U.S. early Wednesday of "endangering peace" with the visit, AFP reports.

Updated 2 hours ago - World

At least 100 killed, 4,000 injured after massive explosion rocks Beirut

Photo: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

A major explosion has slammed central Beirut, Lebanon, damaging buildings as far as several miles away and injuring scores of people.

Driving the news: At least 100 people have been killed and over 4,000 injured in the blast — and the death toll is likely to rise, the Lebanese Red Cross said, per AP. Prime Minister Hassan Diab said the explosions occurred at a warehouse that had been storing 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate for the past six years.