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The U.S. is in the third-longest economic expansion in post-war history. There are more jobs, but wages have been a sore spot: since the financial crash, the typical American's earnings have barely grown when you account for inflation. To track this dynamic over time, I worked with Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed, who analyzed U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data and projections on which this animated chart relies. Sector by sector, the chart follows employment and wages since 2006, just before the crash.

Expand chart
Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Note: Most growth projections are made at the same level of industry detail shown here. In cases where no growth projection exists, the number shown represents one detail level up; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

How to read it: The circles indicate industries, sized by their average number of employees over time. From there, the chart is doing two things — tracking jobs and earnings from 2006 to 2017 (the up and down movement of the circles shows the change in number of jobs; left to right is the change in earnings), and projecting forward from 2014 to 2024 (signified by the intensity of the colors of the circles).

  • The vertical axis indicates change in employment from the same month a year prior
  • The horizontal axis indicates the average wage within the industry
  • Blue circles are industries likely to grow over that decade (deep blue means strong projected growth)
  • Pink means they will shrink (deep pink means serious shrinkage)

The drop down menu lists the major economic sectors.

  • Select manufacturing, and you'll see that it comprises the bulk of industries projected to lose workers
  • To see a snapshot of any industry's historic trajectory, click on its circle.

Digging deeper: When the recession hit in 2008, job growth dipped well into negative territory for most industries. Previous recessions affected certain sectors more than others, but the financial crisis attacked almost every part of the economy. As most industries were shedding jobs through 2009, only health care seemed to fare relatively well.

Since the end of 2009, most industries have been back in positive terrain, steadily adding jobs month over month. "During the recession, middle-wage industries had the steepest job losses," Kolko says. "But in the past year, job growth in middle-wage industries, in jobs like plumbers, painters and tile workers, outpaced both low and high-wage industries." Overall, as the economy nears full employment, wage growth remains sluggish.

Looking ahead: The BLS projects that health care and social assistance will account for over a third of the nation's job growth between 2014 and 2024.

Go deeper

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
2 hours ago - Science

The rise of military space powers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nations around the world are shoring up their defensive and offensive capabilities in space — for today's wars and tomorrow's.

Why it matters: Using space as a warfighting domain opens up new avenues for technologically advanced nations to dominate their enemies. But it can also make those countries more vulnerable to attack in novel ways.