Nov 8, 2018

America's kids are watching YouTube

A boy watches 'Thomas the Tank Engine' on YouTube. Photo: Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images.

About 81% of parents with children 11-years-old or younger say they let their child watch videos on YouTube, according to a new report from Pew Research Center.

Why it matters: Researchers and tech companies are increasingly collecting data on kids' usage of platforms like YouTube to help correlate long-term cognitive effects. The report found that a majority of parents whose children watch videos on YouTube say their children have seen disturbing content on the site.

The survey focused on YouTube which says its platform is not intended for children younger than 13, whereas YouTube Kids has enhanced parental controls and was not surveyed by Pew.

By the numbers: 60% of users surveyed say they sometimes encounter videos that show people engaging in dangerous or troubling behavior.

  • Among parents who let their young child watch content on YouTube, 61% say they have encountered content that they felt was unsuitable for children.

The bottom line: YouTube's algorithm plays a prominent role of what's "up next," which has played many deceiving animated videos for the wrong eyes, per The Verge. And yet, one-fifth of the most-recommended videos were geared toward children, Pew says.

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World coronavirus updates: Global death toll surpasses 34,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The novel coronavirus has now killed more than 34,000 people and infected over 723,000 others globally, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy reported more than 10,700 deaths early Monday.

The big picture: Governments around the world have stepped up public health and economic measures to stop the spread of the virus and soften the financial impact. In the U.S., now the site of the largest outbreak in the world, President Trump said Sunday that his administration will extend its "15 Days to Slow the Spread" guidelines until April 30,

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m. ET: 722,435 — Total deaths: 33,997 — Total recoveries: 151,991.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m.. ET: 142,502 — Total deaths: 2,506 — Total recoveries: 4,856.
  3. Federal government latest: President Trump says his administration will extend its "15 Days to Slow the Spread" guidelines until April 30.
  4. Public health updates: Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from virus.
  5. State updates: Louisiana governor says state is on track to exceed ventilator capacity by end of this week — Cuomo says Trump's mandatory quarantine comments "panicked" some people into fleeing New York
  6. World updates: Italy on Sunday reports 756 new deaths, bringing its total 10,779. Spain reports almost 840 dead, another new daily record that bring its total to over 6,500.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

U.S. coronavirus updates: Infections number tops 140,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The novel coronavirus has now infected over 142,000 people in the U.S. — more than any other country in the world, per Johns Hopkins data.

The big picture: COVID-19 had killed over 2,400 people in the U.S. by Sunday night. That's far fewer than in Italy, where over 10,000 people have died — accounting for a third of the global death toll. The number of people who've recovered from the virus in the U.S. exceeded 2,600 Sunday evening.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 6 hours ago - Health