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Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Technologists in Silicon Valley are becoming more aware of the dangerous effects significant screen time can have and aren't letting their own children use them, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Companies that are spinning out new tech each year have crusader-like mission statements of changing the world for the better. But within the last year, "several high-profile Silicon Valley defectors have been sounding alarms in increasingly dire terms about what these gadgets do to the human brain."

Parents in tech are banning children from phones and even from nannies, now understanding what the effects are on a child's brain, per the Times. They're arguing:

  • Screens can no longer be seen as a learning tool for children.
  • The risks for addiction and stunting development seem high.
  • The debate in Silicon Valley now is about how much exposure to phones is OK.

One key quote: "This is scar tissue talking. We’ve made every mistake in the book, and I think we got it wrong with some of my kids. We glimpsed into the chasm of addiction, and there were some lost years, which we feel bad about," Chris Anderson, the former editor of Wired and now the chief executive of a robotics and drone company, said.

Go deeper

14 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.