Sep 12, 2018

"60 Minutes" executive out after months of misconduct allegations

Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images for Peabody

Jeff Fager, the longtime executive producer of the iconic "60 Minutes" Sunday news broadcast, is out after months of allegations of sexual harassment.

Why it matters: His exit follows the high-profile departure of CBS chief Les Moonves, who left the network Sunday after two reports were published alleging the executive sexually harassed over a dozen women over three decades.

The details: CBS President David Rhodes sent a memo to employees, obtained by Axios and first reported by CNN, detailing Fager's departure.

  • In the memo, CBS President David Rhodes says Fager is leaving because he violated company policy, and that "his departure is not directly related to the allegations surfaced in press reports."
  • Rhodes also explained replacement plans, "Jeff Fager is leaving the company effective immediately. Bill Owens will manage the 60 Minutes team as Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews and I begin the search for a new executive producer of the program."
  • Rhodes says interim CBS chief Joe Ianniello "is in full support of this decision and the transition to come."

The allegations against Fager, allege that he was complicit in allowing a culture of sexual harassment at the network and that he made women uncomfortable while inebriated at company parties.

The big picture: Fager joins a growing list of high-profile network individuals to leave a company in part due to accusations or findings of sexual misconduct, including CBS' Moonves and Charlie Rose, Fox's Roger Ailes and Bill O'Reilly, and NBC's Mark Halperin and Matt Lauer.

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World coronavirus updates: Total cases surge to over 700,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

There are now than more than 700,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus around the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins. The virus has now killed more than 32,000 people — with Italy alone reporting over 10,000 deaths.

The big picture: Governments around the world have stepped up public health and economic measures to stop the spread of the virus and soften the financial impact. In the U.S., now the site of the largest outbreak in the world, President Trump said Saturday he would issue a "strong" travel advisory for New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 704,095 — Total deaths: 33,509 — Total recoveries: 148,824.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 132,637 — Total deaths: 2,351 — Total recoveries: 2,612.
  3. Federal government latest: The first federal prisoner to die from coronavirus was reported from a correctional facility in Louisiana on Sunday.
  4. Public health updates: Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from virus.
  5. State updates: Louisiana governor says state is on track to exceed ventilator capacity by end of this week — Cuomo says Trump's mandatory quarantine comments "really panicked" people
  6. World updates: Italy on Sunday reported 756 new deaths, bringing its total 10,779. Spain reported almost 840 dead, another new daily record that bring its total to over 6,500.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Cuomo: Trump's mandatory quarantine comments "really panicked people"

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a press conference Sunday that President Trump's unexpected Saturday announcement of a possible "short-term" quarantine of New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut to curb the spread of the coronavirus "really panicked people."

Why it matters: Though Trump ruled out the mandatory quarantine later that day, Cuomo said people still called "all night long" asking about the comments and many likely fled the New York area — possibly spreading the virus further.

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