Feb 8, 2022 - Politics & Policy

White House updates Hill on Supreme Court selection

Mike Allen
Justice Stephen Breyer makes his retirement announcement with President Biden in the Roosevelt Room on Jan. 27. Photo: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Biden is still choosing from "a wealth of accomplished and inspiring Black women" for the Supreme Court, the White House says in an update for Capitol Hill and allies.

  • The document says Biden "takes the 'advice' part of the process very seriously."
  • But Biden also "shares senators' view that a president deserves latitude to have his nominees confirmed as long as they are well-qualified."

The full text of the White House document:

  • The President is leading a thorough and rigorous process to name an exceptionally qualified nominee, with strong experience, character, and integrity — who will be the first Black woman to serve on the highest court.
  • It's long overdue that a Black woman serve on the Supreme Court, and there is bipartisan tradition for ensuring that the richness of our country is represented in its leadership and on the highest Court.  
  • The President is choosing from among a wealth of accomplished and inspiring Black women with the strongest record, credentials, and abilities anyone could have for the highest court in our nation.
  • The President believes that choosing a Supreme Court nominee is among the most serious decisions any president faces.
  • He shares senators’ view that a president deserves latitude to have his nominees confirmed as long as they are well-qualified, but as a longtime chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he also takes the “advice” part of the process very seriously.
  • As the President outlined, he is doing his “duty to select a justice not only with the Senate’s consent, but with its advice.”
  • After last week’s meeting with Chair Durbin and Ranking Member Grassley, the President and Vice President and their senior teams, including White House Counsel Dana Remus have spoken with a wide range of Members of Congress and outside legal experts, and that engagement is continuing this week.
Go deeper