Oct 17, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Thousands rally nationwide for Women's March

Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in New York City. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur /AFP via Getty Images

Thousands rallied in cities across the U.S. on Saturday in a Women's March meant "to send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to [President] Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat."

Driving the news: Many attending Saturday's marches — from Washington, D.C., to Mobile, Alabama and Boise, Idaho held signs depicting the late Supreme Court justice, who, before dying last month, reportedly told her granddaughter that her "most fervent wish" was that she would "not be replaced until a new president is installed."

The bottom line: Many attending the Women's March, the latest of several protests that started with a massive demonstration the day after Trump's 2017 inauguration, urged people to get out and vote.

  • “[Trump's] presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March said on Saturday, per AP.
ikki Cole, National Policy Campaign Director of One Fair Wage, rallies at the base of an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential,
Nikki Cole, national policy campaign director of One Fair Wage, rallies at the base of an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential, representing service worker’s demand for respect, full pay and fair elections, at the Women's March in a Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage)
Demonstrators rally to take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in New York City. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)
Many in New York City held signs encouraging people to vote in November. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in New York City
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators rally as they take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in New York City.
Many protesters held signs depicting Ginsburg and her words during Saturday's Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Marchers pose with an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essentia
Marchers in Washington, D.C., pose with an 18-foot wooden statue of Elena the Essential. Photo: Paul Morigi/Getty Images for One Fair Wage
Dressed as handmaids, protesters attend the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza on October 17, 2020 in Washington, DC
Demonstrators took to the streets in honor of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and to protest President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court before the November election. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
A women holds a sign that says, "Down with patriarchy," at the Women's March in New York City.
A women holds a sign that says, "smash with patriarchy," at the Women's March in New York City. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images
Women's march participants look on to supporters of Trump and his Supreme Court nominee.
Demonstrators march past the Supreme Court in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C.. Some supporters of Trump and Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett also rallied on Saturday. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images
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