Updated Jun 4, 2020 - Economy & Business

ZoomInfo's IPO is the largest in tech this year

Illustration of the Zoominfo logo surrounded by falling money. 
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

ZoomInfo, a Vancouver, Wash.-based SaaS platform for sales, marketing, and recruiting data, raised $935 million in its IPO. The company priced 44.5 million shares at $21, above its original $16-$18 price range, for an initial market cap of around $8 billion.

Why it matters: It's the year's largest tech IPO, and is likely to get some trading boost from confusion with videoconferencing company Zoom Communications.

  • Details: ZoomInfo reported $400,000 of net income on $102 million in revenue for Q1, and will trade on the Nasdaq (ZI). JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley were the lead IPO underwriters, while company shareholders include TA Associates and the Carlyle Group.
  • Bonus: Why does every startup sound fast now?

Between the lines: ZoomInfo had to navigate unusual conditions, conducting its roadshow virtually and amid nationwide protests. "It's not the backdrop I think anybody had hoped for," CEO Henry Schuck told Axios. "The things happening in our country are a lot more important than a tech company IPOing."

Investors, though, urged the company to go forward with its IPO given it was both growing and generating cash.

What they're saying: Schuck said the company, which uses machine learning to help provide businesses with sales and marketing leads, has also helped a number of small businesses pivot amid a drastically changed economy.

  • One example is a tent company that saw its traditional business evaporate, but pitched itself as a solution for COVID-testing centers and mobile hospitals. ZoomInfo helped connect them to industries they knew nothing about and led to their best sales month ever.
  • ZoomInfo itself saw its best first month of a quarter ever in April, Schuck said.

The bottom line: "The company says it has 202,000 paying users, serving 15,000 companies, with market intelligence and data analytics on 14 million companies." — Brian Deagon, IBD

Go deeper