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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The 2020 Democratic field splits into two rough camps: anger vs. optimism.

The big picture: Democrats ultimately have to choose between someone who's the mirror image of President Trump (an angry fighter) — or the opposite (an optimistic pragmatist).

  • One Democratic operative said you can even see the difference by turning down the sound on the candidates' announcement videos.
  • Sen. Kamala Harris is the clearest example of a candidate who so far has straddled the two camps.

The fighters are defined by their brand of liberal populism:

  • Think Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, who argue that Americans are victimized not just by Trump, but by corporations, billionaires, and a rigged system.
  • Exhibit A ... Warren tweeted yesterday: "I want to be absolutely clear: this ridiculous wall isn’t a national emergency, and Donald Trump isn’t king. We’ll fight this with everything we’ve got."

The optimists paint a hopeful, and relatively more moderate, view:

  • Sens. Cory Booker and Amy Klobuchar, as well as Julián Castro fall squarely in this category. So would Joe Biden, Sen. Sherrod Brown and Beto O'Rourke if they were to run.
  • Exhibit B ... Klobuchar tweeted yesterday: "Both sides of my family arrived in America with nothing but a suitcase, looking for a better life for their families. Their story isn’t so different from people working towards opportunity today. It's past time for comprehensive immigration reform."

What the polls show: Democratic voters value electability. 56% "prefer someone who would be a strong candidate against Trump even if they disagree with that candidate on most issues," according to a recent Monmouth University poll.

  • "People will be willing to set aside ideology because they want a winner," said Matt Bennett, co-founder of centrist think tank Third Way.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
56 mins ago - Science

The rise of military space powers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nations around the world are shoring up their defensive and offensive capabilities in space — for today's wars and tomorrow's.

Why it matters: Using space as a warfighting domain opens up new avenues for technologically advanced nations to dominate their enemies. But it can also make those countries more vulnerable to attack in novel ways.