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Expand chart
Data: Advertising Analytics; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

While some of the lower-spending 2020 Democrats are investing most of their dollars in digital ads, the biggest spenders — Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer — are overwhelmingly spending more on television ads as a percentage of their budgets.

Why it matters: Their ad spend stands in stark contrast to that of the Trump campaign, which is investing much more heavily in digital advertising, especially on Facebook.

Be smart: 2020 was supposed to be the year that digital got closer to overtaking television as a percentage of presidential campaign spend, and if it weren't for the two billionaires on the left entering the race, it very well may have been.

  • Without those two candidates, all candidates (including Trump) in the past year have spent a collective $75 million on TV ads — roughly $60 million on broadcast and $15.5 million on cable — compared to nearly $80 million spent so far on digital ads.

The big picture: The big critique of Democrats in 2016 was that the party was too reliant on consultants and an outdated organizational structure to invest enough in digital.

  • Conversations with many sources in the political advertising world say that the same dynamic persists ahead of 2020. However, digital investments have increased overall, especially as candidates have found themselves under more pressure to solicit people online for small-dollar donations in order to qualify for debates.

Yes, but: Democrats have pledged to pour many millions more into digital through third-party groups, and some candidates — like Pete Buttigieg and Elisabeth Warren — are still spending more online than on TV.

  • A political action committee affiliated with the digital progressive group ACRONYM announced in November that it would launch a $75 million digital advertising campaign to take on President Trump.
  • Priorities USA, one of the biggest progressive political groups, has spent roughly $7 million on digital ads over the past year.
  • While Bloomberg's campaign has spent roughly $33 million to date on digital ads, it has pledged to spend up to $100 million throughout the course of his campaign in a digital anti-Trump ad blitz.

Between the lines: Digital "acquisition" ads, especially on Facebook and Google search, are typically used to help campaigns build lists to lure small-dollar and volunteers. Video "persuasion" ads on platforms like YouTube and on local broadcast television, are usually used to get voters to cast ballots or take action on an issue.

  • It's for this reason that broadcast spend tends to increase towards big primary events, like the Iowa caucuses and Super Tuesday, when candidates need voters to take action.

Go deeper

White House says it expects federal contractors to be vaccinated by Dec. 8

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The White House said in new guidance Friday that it expects millions of federal contractors to be vaccinated against the coronavirus no later than Dec. 8.

Why it matters: Companies with federal contractors have been waiting for formal guidance from the White House before requiring those employees to get vaccinated, according to Reuters.

CDC director maintains Pfizer booster recommendation for high-risk workers

Rochelle Walensky listens during a confirmation hearing on July 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Rochelle Walensky on Friday reiterated her decision to go against a recommendation by a CDC advisory panel that refused to endorse booster shots for workers whose jobs put them at high risk for contracting COVID-19.

Driving the news: "Our healthcare systems are once again at maximum capacity in parts of the country, our teachers are facing uncertainty as they walk into the classroom," Walensky said at a Friday briefing. "I must do what I can to preserve the health across our nation."

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Democrats release full text of Biden's $3.5T reconciliation package

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Friday unveiled the full text of President Biden's $3.5 trillion social spending package.

Why it matters: Democrats are racing to finish negotiations and get the bill on the floor as soon as possible so Pelosi can fulfill her promises to both House centrists and progressives about the timing and sequencing of passing the party's dual infrastructure packages.