Mar 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Video explainer: How contested conventions work

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Bloomberg: "I don't think I can win" without a contested convention

Mike Bloomberg on Super Tuesday at El Pub Restaurant restaurant in Miami's Little Havana neighborhood. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

MIAMI, Fla. — Mike Bloomberg told reporters Tuesday that he has "no intention of dropping out" of the presidential race despite calls for Democratic moderates to coalesce around Joe Biden, adding that his path to the nomination depends on a contested convention.

Why it matters: Today's Super Tuesday contests are the first with Bloomberg's name on the ballot — marking the first measure of whether he has a real shot at the Democratic nomination.

Exclusive: DNC chair says he's "not contemplating" an online convention

In an interview with "Axios on HBO," Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez flatly denied that he was even entertaining the idea of canceling July's Democratic convention in Milwaukee and replacing it with an online convention due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Driving the news: In the interview, which was taped Monday in Florida and will air Sunday night at 6pm ET/PT, I asked Perez whether he would cancel the Democratic convention given that major companies are canceling events across the country because of the virus. "No," Perez replied.

AP: Sanders can't match Biden's Super Tuesday delegate haul

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and former Vice President Joe Biden debate in Charleston, South Carolina on Feb. 25. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden won more delegates than Sen. Bernie Sanders and the rest of the 2020 candidates who competed in Super Tuesday contests, the AP counted on Friday.

The big picture: Projected Super Tuesday wins for Biden included North Carolina, Virginia, Massachusetts, Texas, Minnesota and Alabama — while projected wins for Sanders included California and Colorado.