Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!
Data: 247Sports; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

College basketball's regular signing period began yesterday, and with only a handful of players still undecided, the 2020 recruiting class has begun to take shape.

By the numbers: The chart above specifically captures the 119 four- and five-star recruits, per 247 Sports.

  • 40 players come from four states: California (14), Georgia (11), Virginia (8), Florida (7).
  • 39 locations represented: 34 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Canada, Mexico, New Zealand.
  • 57 schools: The 119 recruits have committed to 57 different schools, while five players are hoping to jump straight to the NBA and six remain undecided.
  • 7 schools: There were seven schools who ended the 2019-20 season in the AP Top 25 but failed to land a single four- or five-star recruit (Dayton, San Diego State, Villanova, Seton Hall, BYU, Butler and Iowa).

Highlights:

  • Top 10 recruits: 1. Cade Cunningham (Oklahoma State), 2. Evan Mobley (USC), 3. Jalen Green (undecided), 4. Terrence Clarke (Kentucky), 5. Ziaire Williams (Stanford), 6. Scottie Barnes (FSU), 7. B.J. Boston (Kentucky), 8. Jalen Suggs (Gonzaga), 8. Greg Brown (undecided), 10. Joshua Christopher (Arizona State).
  • Top 10 classes: Kentucky and Duke lead the way with six four- and five-star recruits each, while North Carolina, Tennessee, LSU, Arkansas, Auburn, NC State, Oklahoma State and Gonzaga round out the top 10.

The backdrop: College basketball used to be a place where teenage superstars introduced themselves to the world and first became household names.

  • But in an era where star athletes have already built "brands" by the time they graduate high school — and with the one-and-done rule expected to be reversed by 2022 — the role of college hoops is in flux.
  • For some top-tier talent, like No. 10 prospect Christopher, college is merely a mandated pit stop en route to the NBA.

What they're saying: Here's Josh's father, Laron Christopher, speaking with The Athletic (subscription):

"I asked every college that we've spoken to, 'OK, you guys have a platform. We have a brand.' I told them, 'We're not going to stay [in college] forever, so we want to know how you're gonna roll this out. How can we use your platform to increase our brand, as well as your brand? Both are important. They're important to you, they're important to us.'"

P.S. ... This recruiting class is chock full of NBA legacies, with Jamal Mashburn Jr., Kenyon Martin Jr., Jabri Abdur-Rahim (Shareef's son), Makur Maker (Thon's brother) and Marcus Bagley (Marvin's brother) all among the top 100.

Go deeper: Coronavirus causes delay in WNBA season and training camps

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

4 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.