Various lower-tier candidates are leading the 2020 race in one way: they've raised most of their money from small-dollar donors.

Why it matters: Fundraising as a whole can be a proxy for voter enthusiasm. But especially small donations, which Democrats have been fighting to get from regular people who want to give their money to campaigns — and mostly online.

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Data: FEC; Note: Includes candidates whose authorized committees raised at least $2 million in individual donations in Q2 2019; Chart: Harry Stevens/Axios
  • Some Democratic campaigns privately say that their small-dollar donations suggest they've attracted lower-income and minority voters. Others say it shows their strength with the grassroots wing of the party.

Between the lines: It makes sense that Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have raised more than 65% of their money from small contributions — they've both sworn off high-dollar fundraisers.

  • Andrew Yang's popularity online could explain how he's raised a majority of his money from nominal donations.
  • Julián Castro's campaign often emails supporters asking for just $15, and has even sent some "humbly asking you to pitch in $1 or more."

The big picture: ActBlue, the Democratic online fundraising platform, says it has raised $420 million so far in 2019.

  • Grassroots donors gave $246 million in Q2 alone
  • 3.3 million unique donors have contributed to nearly 9,000 Democratic campaigns and organizations this cycle overall
  • Compared to the same point in the 2018 cycle: donors had given $249 million, and 4.9 million people made contributions through ActBlue throughout the entire 2018 cycle.

The bottom line: Keep an eye on these small-dollar Democratic donations, especially online — that's what helped them break fundraising records in the 2018 midterms.

Go deeper: Axios' 2020 fundraising tracker for every candidate for federal office

Go deeper

27 mins ago - Sports

Sports return stalked by coronavirus

Tampa Bay Rays left fielder Austin Meadows bumps elbows Friday during a workout at Tropicana Field. Photo: Kim Klement/USA Today Sports via Reuters

When MLB teams arrived at the ballpark this weekend for the first summer workouts of 2020, the comforting sounds of baseball brought smiles to players' faces.

Between the lines: Even the loudest crack of the bat couldn't mask the eerie silence or distract from the ever-present coronavirus threat.

239 scientists call on WHO to recognize coronavirus as airborne

People walk at the boardwalk in Venice Beach. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

A group of 239 scientists in 32 countries is calling for the World Health Organization to revise its recommendations to account for airborne transmission as a significant factor in how the coronavirus spreads, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The WHO has said the virus mainly spreads via large respiratory droplets that fall to the ground once they've been discharged in coughs and sneezes. But the scientists say evidence shows the virus can spread from smaller particles that linger in air indoors.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,294,859 — Total deaths: 531,419 — Total recoveries — 6,078,552Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,839,917 — Total deaths: 129,676 — Total recoveries: 894,325 — Total tested: 34,858,427Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona hot spot near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.