Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Snapchat has had more than 400,000 users to register to vote using its app in less than a month — and a majority of those were 18 to 24 years old, according to a company spokesperson.

Why it matters: The response highlights both the trusting relationship Snapchat has with its younger audience and the technology used to get users to easily register on their phones.

  • How it worked: Snapchat partnered with Democracy Works to integrate their "TurboVote" tool into the app for two weeks, sending a mass video message to users urging them to register.

Between the lines: Snap's push underscores the company's commitment to keeping its younger audience engaged in the political process. The company launched "Good Luck America" in 2016, its first original show on its platform, with a focus on explaining national politics to young people in a digestible way.

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Most arrested in protests are not associated with antifa

Protesters demonstrate as a Salt Lake City police vehicle burns on May 30. Photo: Rick Bowmer/AP

Antifa may be a focus on the right, but it's hard to find in the court system.

Why it matters: Very few of the people charged in this summer's protests and riots appear to be affiliated with highly organized extremist groups, reports AP.

24 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Republican super PAC raised $92 million in September

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Photo: The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC associated with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, raised more than twice as much this September as it did two years ago, according to an FEC filing that will go live Tuesday night.

By the numbers: The SLF raised $92 million in September, spent $105 million, and ended the month with $113 million cash on hand, as Republicans work to maintain their majority on Nov. 3.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
25 mins ago - Economy & Business

The evolution of HR

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Before the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, human resources jobs were on the automation chopping block. Now they're essential.

The big picture: HR departments across the world have pulled off the incredible feat of turning companies from in-person to remote overnight, and as the pandemic continues to determine the future of work, HR has been elevated from a back-office function to a C-suite conversation.