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Expand chart
Data: United by Interest; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

If Democrats take back the House in November, 2019 could have more minority representatives in Congress than it's had in its 230-year history.

Why it matters: Congress would finally start to look more like the country it represents.

The big picture: 50 years ago, white men made up 97% of the House, Washington-based lobbying firm United by Interest outlines in their latest diversity memo, obtained first by Axios.

  • But in 2017 (the latest recorded data), racial and ethnic minorities represented more than 45% of House Democrats, and women made up one-third of the Democratic chamber.
  • Both numbers, which have been on a steady rise for years (as depicted in the above chart), are expected to grow this year, thanks to a historically high number of women candidates running in the 2018 midterm elections and groundbreaking primary wins by minority Democrats who overthrew their white incumbent challengers.
  • Compare this to 2016: According to United by Interest, 40% of Hillary Clinton voters were minorities, while 88% of Donald Trump's voters were white.

The other side: While voters across the country are increasingly choosing to elect candidates who look like them, the media covering Congress are still lagging far behind with regard to diversity.

  • According to a survey last year by the American Society of News Editors, 83% of the workforce at U.S. daily print and online media outlets is white, and 87% of leadership positions are occupied by white reporters and editors.
  • Meanwhile, men represent 61% of the workforce at those news outlets, and a similar share of the industry’s leadership positions, according to the survey.

Go deeper: Meet Congress' potential history-makers in 2019.

Go deeper

Senate confirms former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm as energy secretary

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 64-35 on Thursday to confirm former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm as secretary of the Department of Energy.

Why it matters: Granholm, only the second woman to head the department, will play a key role in President Biden’s efforts to accelerate the U.S. shift to clean energy and help other countries do the same.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: How data and the pandemic have democratized the "high-performance lifestyle — "Twindemic" averted as flu reports plummet amid coronavirus crisis
  2. Vaccine: Pfizer begins study on 3rd vaccine dose as booster shot against new strains — Republicans are least likely to want the coronavirus vaccine
  3. U.S. news: California surpasses 50,000 deaths COVID-19 deaths, more than any other state — Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter return to church after receiving COVID-19 vaccines
  4. Local: Public transit ridership in Twin Cities dropped 53% amid pandemic — Data firm predicts "complete chaos" in next phases of Florida's vaccine rolloutAlaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy tests positive for the coronavirus

Acting Capitol Police chief: Phone logs show Jan. 6 National Guard approval was delayed

Pittman at a congressional tribute for fallen officer Brian Sicknick. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Acting U.S. Capitol Police chief Yogananda Pittman testified on Thursday that cellphone records show former USCP chief Steven Sund requested National Guard support from the House sergeant-at-arms as early as 12:58pm on Jan. 6, but he did not receive approval until over an hour later.

Why it matters: Sund and former House sergeant-at-arms Paul Irving clashed at a Senate hearing on Tuesday over a dispute in the timeline for when Capitol Police requested the National Guard during the Capitol insurrection.