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Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on Friday that the company will review a number of its policies and decision-making processes, including for content about state use of force.

Why it matters: Facebook has faced backlash for its decision to leave up a post from President Trump because it didn't violate the social media company's policy about inciting violence.

  • Zuckerberg's public announcement echoed much of what he said to employees during a company question-and-answer session earlier this week, according to a recording Vox obtained.

Notably, Zuckerberg ended his public message by declaring that "black lives matter."

  • In 2016, he condemned incidents of employees crossing off "Black lives Matter" postings on office walls and writing "All Lives Matter" over the top, calling the actions "disrespectful" and "malicious."

Go deeper: Read Zuckerberg's full memo.

Go deeper

Tech's election-season survival plan: transparency

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Leading U.S. tech platforms are going out of their way to reveal how their businesses, policies and algorithms work ahead of November in a bid to avoid blame for election-related trouble.

Why it matters: Until recently, tech companies found it useful to be opaque about their policies and technology — stopping bad actors from gaming their systems and competitors from copying their best features. But all that happened anyway, and now the firms' need to recapture trust is making transparency look like a better bet.

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. (Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images)

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.