Jul 20, 2017

YouTube will try to intervene in searches for extremist content

Danny Moloshok / AP

YouTube is mounting an intervention when users search for terms linked to extremism. The company said that when those searches are performed it will "display a playlist of videos debunking violent extremist recruiting narratives."

What's next: YouTube will also show the content when non-English keywords are searched for, and it will make counter-extremist videos in collaboration with outside groups.

Why YouTube is doing this: Governments, particularly in Europe, really want YouTube and other major tech companies to do more to combat the spread of extremist messaging on their platforms.

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