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YouTube being opened on a phone. Photo: Omar Marques/LightRocket via Getty Images

Generation Z students, classified as being between the ages of 14 and 23, believe that YouTube is a bigger contributor to their education than textbooks, according to a study by Pearson Education.

Why it matters: Education in America is shifting from more traditional methods of learning through text and lesson plans to more technological methods such as YouTube videos and other virtual platforms.

Methodology: The study polled nearly 2,500 people ranging from 14 to 40 years old and asked them about their preferred education methods.

By the numbers: YouTube was the preferred education method for Gen. Z students, but was less prevalent among Millennials.

  • 59% of Gen. Z students preferred to learn from YouTube, while only 55% of Millennials preferred it.
  • 60% of Millennials said they preferred to learn from textbooks, while 47% of Gen. Z students preferred the same.

The big picture: YouTube launched in 2005 — meaning most of Gen Z grew up with it. 85% of teenagers say they use YouTube more than any other social platform, according to Pew research.

  • It also provides quick, to-the-point answers for questions they may have as well as the option to rewind, writes Lauraine Genota of Ed Week.

YouTube is changing the way educators think as some school districts even have their own YouTube channels accessible for both teachers and students.

Yes, but: While YouTube is packed with information and tutorials, it can also be a dangerous place for students with misinformation running rampant.

  • The company was under fire earlier this year for targeting children with advertisements after gathering their personal data.
  • The platform is also home to conspiracy content, which could be inadvertently recommended to students.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Financial regulation is not exactly simple anywhere in the world. But one country stands out for the sheer amount of complexity and confusion in its regulatory regime — the U.S.

Why it matters: Important companies fall through the cracks, largely unregulated, while others contend with a vast array of regulatory bodies, none of which are remotely predictable.

Trump nominee Christopher Waller confirmed to Fed board

Christopher Waller at a Senate Banking hearing earlier this year. (Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)

The Senate voted 48-47 on Thursday to confirm Trump nominee Christopher Waller to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors — filling one of the two vacant slots on the influential economic body.

Why it matters: It's one of the last marks left on the Fed board by Trump, who has nominated five of its six members.

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Boeing gets huge 737 Max order from Ryanair, boosting hope for quick rebound

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Dublin-based Ryanair said it would add 75 more planes to an existing order for Boeing's 737 Max airplanes, a giant vote of confidence as Boeing seeks to revive sales of its best-selling plane after a 20-month safety ban following two fatal crashes.

The big picture: Ryanair's big order, on the heels of breakthrough vaccine news, is also a promising sign that the devastated airline industry might recover from the global pandemic sooner than expected.