Updated Feb 19, 2018

A year after Uber memo, sexual harassment far from fixed

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

In the year since Susan Fowler's viral blog post about her experiences working at Uber, executives have lost jobs, dozens of women have spoken out about sexual harassment in the workplace, and the #MeToo movement's revival in October has spread throughout business, politics and Hollywood. (See our timeline here.)

Yes, but: Underneath Uber's changes and the broader embrace of women speaking out, holding employers accountable and rectifying other forms of workplace discrimination remains a challenge.

  • Google is still pushing back on claims by the Labor Department and four female former employees that it pays women less than men.
  • Uber is also being sued by three female former employees, who allege being paid less than male peers and passed up for promotions.
  • Some male investors have responded to the wave of sexual harassment stories by declaring it's no longer safe for them to meet with female entrepreneurs. Others have criticized the women for being too sensitive or overreacting.
  • Many employee agreements still include arbitration clauses and class action waivers (which Fowler is helping fight against) that make it harder to fight against illegal employment practices.
  • The past year's discourse has also not addressed in great depth the addition of racism that women of color in tech and other industries also experience.
  • More broadly, the effect of workplace harassment and stress on employee mental health has seen little discussion.

Some progress: Nevertheless, there has been some visible change. Harassers have lost jobs, VC firms have instituted stronger policies, and even Google promptly fired a male engineer for his 10-page memo criticizing the company's diversity efforts.

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JPMorgan Chase to pull support for some fossil fuels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

JPMorgan Chase said Monday that it won’t directly finance new oil and gas development in the Arctic and will significantly curtail its financing of the extraction and burning of coal.

Why it matters: JPMorgan is the world’s largest funder of fossil-fuel companies, according to a report by the Rainforest Action Network (RAN). The announcement follows similar moves by other big banks and investment firms, including Goldman Sachs and BlackRock.

WHO won't call coronavirus a pandemic as cases spread

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The World Health Organization will not yet call the coronavirus a pandemic, claiming that needs across affected countries are too varied and the classification would increase fear, per a briefing Monday.

The big picture: As South Korea and Italy stepped up emergency measures in efforts to thwart the spread of the virus, WHO expressed concern about infections with no clear link to China. COVID-19 has killed at least 2,620 people and infected almost 80,000 others, with all but 27 deaths occurring in mainland China.

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