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Britain's highest paid CEO, Martin Sorrell of WPP advertising agency, told Google to "step up and take responsibility" for the content that's shared on its platforms. He was speaking on a panel with Google's U.K. managing director Ronan Harris at the Festival of British Advertising in London Friday, per Business Insider. Sorrell's criticism comes after a high-profile investigation by The Times which discovered that a number of brand ads were appearing next to terrorist videos on YouTube and hate sites.

Harris tried to defend Google, and stated that the company has been able to "allay concerns" by explaining how it works to prevent these incidents from happening, but Sorrell wasn't buying it: "You haven't allayed their concerns. You can spin this, Ronan, or we can speak the truth... You have the resources, your margins are enormous, you have control of the algorithms, and you don't explain to people how those algorithms work."

Why it matters: Google and Facebook have an effective "duopoly" over digital ad revenue, eating up more than 90% of all new ad dollars. In light of this, both companies are experiencing heightened pressure from the publishing industry to re-assure ad buyers and advertisers of the quality of inventory their ads are running up against.

What Google's doing about it: Google has been actively going after bad ads and hate sites for a while, but its scale makes it difficult to effectively regulate everything that is automated accross its platform. In 2016, Google reviewed 550 sites in November and December that they thought pushed deceptive content, including mimicking news organizations to look authoritative and real. In the end, 340 were punished, and 200 were permanently banned.

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Louisiana braces for 3rd hurricane in 2 months as Tropical Storm Zeta nears

Municipality workers clean the streets of garbage in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, on Tuesday that was left by Zeta, which struck the Yucatan Peninsula as a Category 1 Hurricane a day earlier — causing no major damage to infrastructure. Photo: Medios y Media/Getty Images

Tropical Storm Zeta is expected to strengthen back into a hurricane and bring dangerous storm surge conditions to parts of the northern Gulf Coast on Wednesday, per the National Hurricane Center.

The state of play: Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) requested a pre-landfall Federal Declaration of Emergency in a letter to President Trump on Tuesday, ahead of the storm's expected arrival south of New Orleans.

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Trump's campaign website hacked

A screenshot of the Trump campaign website after it was hacked.

The Trump campaign website briefly went down and its "About" page was modified after hackers attacked the site Tuesday evening.

The big picture: With just seven days before the election, the hackers emulated the FBI and declared on the "About" page that: "this was seized. the world has had enough of the fake-news spreaded [sic] daily by president donald j trump. it is time to allow the world to know truth." Two addresses linked to the cryptocurrency Monero appeared on the site. Trump campaign spokesperson Tim Murtaugh in a statement said no sensitive data had been exposed in the attack.

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