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Reproduced from CivicScience; Note: ±3.3% margin of error; Chart: Axios Visuals

Americans' comfort level with returning to their offices for work breaks down along a number of interesting demographic lines, new data from CivicScience shows.

The state of play: Men are 20% more likely than women to prefer returning to in-person work and young people (ages 18–24) are the most likely to prefer returning to the office.

  • 42% of young people 18–24 say they would prefer going back to the office rather than staying remote or even having a combination of both options.
  • The youngest workers are also the most likely (44%) to say they have been significantly less productive than usual working from home.
  • Just behind the youngest respondents, 32% of Americans over 55 say they would prefer returning to the office — four and eight percentage points higher than respondents ages 35–54 and 25–34, respectively.
  • 48% of U.S. adults overall working remotely during the pandemic say they have been just as productive as usual.

Go deeper

Oct 27, 2020 - World

Putin mandates face masks as Russia combats second COVID-19 wave

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Photo: Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday instituted a nationwide mask mandate, as the nation tries to combat a second spike of COVID-19 cases, according to an order published by Rospotrebnadzor, the federal health watchdog agency.

By the numbers: Russia currently has the fourth-most coronavirus cases in the world, with 1,537,142, according to Johns Hopkins data, behind the U.S., India and Brazil. Russia has reported 26,092 deaths to date.

Updated Jan 18, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
Updated 3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden has arrived at the White House and he will sign executive orders and other presidential actions.