Nov 9, 2019

Women's Trump-era power surge

Illustration: Axios Visuals

A surge of female winners in this week's state elections — most of them Democrats, and many of them women of color — reflect women's rising political power since the 2016 election, AP reports.

Why it matters: Tuesday's results mean women will hold majorities in places like the Boston City Council, long seen by many as a "boys' club," and lead communities such as Scranton, Pa., where voters elected the city's first female mayor just weeks before she's due to give birth.

In Virginia, Juli Briskman, a cyclist who was fired after she flipped off President Trump's motorcade, was elected to the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors, representing an area that's home to one of his golf courses.

  • Briskman said her run-in with Trump inspired her to get involved in politics.
  • "I think this administration has done that for a lot of women," Briskman, a single mom, told AP. "They've just decided, 'OK, if someone like this can get elected ... we need to start speaking up and changing it.'"

In Maine, a 23-year-old Somali-American woman was elected to the Lewiston City Council, defeating another Democrat and what she described as "internet trolls" who lobbed racist and sexist attacks via social media.

  • GOP women were behind record wins in Mississippi, where 12 women — eight Republicans and four Democrats — won seats in the state Senate. The previous record was nine, set in 2016.

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For Castro, Booker in Iowa, largest proportion of donations come from women

Julián Castro in Iowa on Sept. 21. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

More than 60% of campaign contributions that 2020 presidential candidates Julián Castro and Cory Booker have received in Iowa came from women, according to Federal Election Commission filings analyzed by the Des Moines Register and OpenSecrets.

Why it matters: Historically, men donated more to presidential campaigns than women. The Register and OpenSecrets notes that the gap is closing, especially in Iowa, where men and women have so far donated about equal amounts to Democratic presidential candidates. Women donated to Castro and Booker at a higher proportion than any of the top-polling women running for president, the analysis found.

Go deeperArrowDec 2, 2019

Clinton: Misogyny played a role in 2016 election loss to Trump

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the Southbank Centre in London on Sunday evening. Photo: Aaron Chown/PA Images via Getty Images

2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Sunday that misogyny was "certainly" a factor in her election loss to President Trump and that social media is fueling attacks on high-profile women, Reuters reports.

"There is a reaction to a lot of the success of women and the roles of women right now, and I think social media has lit that up, in a very destructive and toxic way. People may have thought a lot of things in the past, but now it is amplified and it is viral."
— Clinton's comments, per Reuters
Go deeperArrowNov 11, 2019

California's "women quota" in boardrooms faces pushback

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

California’s unprecedented law requiring all public companies headquartered there to have at least one female board member by 2020 is drawing lawsuits.

Why it matters: Pressure to diversify corporate boards has historically come from shareholders and special interest groups. With California's law poised to take effect — and at least three states weighing similar legislation — critics are raising the question of government overreach.

Go deeperArrowNov 18, 2019