Apr 29, 2017

Why Trump critics should smile

Evan Vucci / AP

For all the readers who hate President Trump and see his first 100 days as an epic failure, step back in time for a moment, to election night.

After you wiped away the tears, you wallowed in your fears: Trump would deport immigrants, start erecting a massive wall, unload a clown car of sycophants at every federal agency. He would wage war with NATO and start a trade war with China. America, as we know it, would crumble.

The first 100 days have been a wild reality show, full of bombast and intrigue. But, if you separate hot rhetoric from lukewarm action, your worst nightmares did not materialize.

Sound smart: Maybe the people who should be most hacked off about the first 100 days are those who wanted radical change and got conventional results.

America First, it turns out, looks a lot like conventional conservatism. This could easily be the first 100 days of a President Mike Pence:

  • Conventional conservative Supreme Court pick.
  • Conventional conservative health-care bill.
  • Conventional conservative tax-reform ideals.
  • Conventional conservative reg reforms.
  • Conventional conservative approach to NATO, China, Syria, Iran, Israel and defense spending.
  • Conventional conservative picks for Defense, State, Homeland Security and even the NSC, after Michael Flynn was booted.

Coming attraction: Keepers of the classic Trumpian campaign flame claim more wins to come in their war of ideas, especially on trade. But the momentum is with the mainstream.

Relive the magic: CNN compiled the nearly 600 Trump-related news alerts it sent in the first 99 days.

Just posted ... The White House's 3-minute video, "President Trump's First 100 Days," including a pastiche of cable news clips ("He's pretty close to perfect"), backed by soaring music.

Go deeper

World coronavirus updates: Spain's health care system overloaded

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Two planes carrying protective equipment arrived to restock Spain’s overloaded public health system on Wednesday as confirmed cases surpassed 100,000 and the nation saw its biggest death toll so far, Reuters reports.

The big picture: COVID-19 cases surged past 930,000 and the global death toll exceeded 46,000 on Wednesday night, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy has reported more than 13,000 deaths.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 7 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 932,605 — Total deaths: 46,809 — Total recoveries: 193,177Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 213,372 — Total deaths: 4,757 — Total recoveries: 8,474Map.
  3. Business updates: Small businesses are bearing the brunt of the coronavirus job crisis.
  4. World update: Spain’s confirmed cases surpassed 100,000, and the nation saw its biggest daily death toll so far. More than 500 people were reported dead within the last 24 hours in the U.K., per Johns Hopkins.
  5. State updates: Florida and Pennsylvania are the latest states to issue stay-at-home orders — Michigan has more than 9,000 confirmed cases, an increase of 1,200 and 78 new deaths in 24 hours.
  6. Stock market updates: Stocks closed more than 4% lower on Wednesday, continuing a volatile stretch for the stock market amid the coronavirus outbreak.
  7. 1 future thing: Shifts to telemedicine, at-home diagnostics, and drone delivery are all likely lasting consequences from this pandemic.
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

U.S. coronavirus updates: Confirmed cases surpass 200,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Positive cases of the novel coronavirus passed 213,000 on Wednesday — nearly twice as many as Italy, per Johns Hopkins — as more state governors issued stay-at-home orders for Americans to curb infection.

The state of play: Trump administration officials are anonymously sounding the alarm that America's emergency stockpile of personal protective equipment is running dangerously low, the Washington Post reports.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 16 mins ago - Health