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Old Dominion University's head basketball coach Jeff Jones is recovering from prostate cancer. Photo: Jessica Hill / AP

"Men need to hear the story of [Old Dominion University basketball] coach Jeff Jones' recovery from prostate cancer" — Harry Minium, sports columnist for The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk:

"Prostate cancer may kill nearly 27,000 men per year, yet it's a disease with an almost non-existent media profile. ... Jones [husband of Axios' Danielle Jones] thinks he understands why. ... Prostate cancer can be a particularly sensitive subject for men because it can go right to the heart of a guy's manhood."

  • "The manliest athletes, from the NFL to the NBA, don't think twice about wearing pink to show camaraderie with breast cancer survivors. ... But if you're a guy I'll bet you don't know that light blue is the color that signifies prostate cancer, or that September was prostate cancer awareness month."
  • Why it matters: "Testing, he said, is the key to beating the disease. Had he not applied for a new life insurance policy in 2014, he would not have been tested, and would not have known he had cancer."

Worthy of your time.

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with First Lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.