Cans of beer. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

You should care about trade debates for one simple reason: they directly affect how much you pay for cool or necessary things. 

The spikes:

  • Cars and trucks could be as much as $400 more expensive, reports Fortune.
  • Beer and soda could be costlier as brewers deal with pricier aluminum cans.
  • The same goes for canned soup and beans.

And if the White House's massive list of proposed tariffs on 1,300 Chinese products goes into effect, it could raise prices — in some cases by hundreds of dollars — for ...

  • Flat-screen TVs, printers, copiers, dishwashers, plows, snow blowers, fire extinguishers, golf carts, medical devices and more.

Go deeperThe winners and losers (mostly losers) in a U.S.-China trade war.

Go deeper

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