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The latest Affordable Care Act repeal and replacement bill, sponsored by Sens. Bill Cassidy, Lindsey Graham, Dean Heller and Ron Johnson, would both reduce and redistribute federal health care funding to the states. And that would create clear winners and losers among states. The left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities ran the numbers to figure out how each state would fare.

Our thought bubble: This is the biggest reason we think the Graham-Cassidy bill is unlikely to go anywhere. To pass it, GOP senators from states like Arizona and Florida would have to vote to give up federal dollars to, effectively, subsidize states like Texas and Alabama.

Expand chart
Data: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities analysis; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

What the bill would do:

  • Converts funding for the ACA's premium subsidies and Medicaid expansion into a block grant, which would result in states getting less money. This funding would stop after 2026.
  • Changes the current open-ended federal match for Medicaid spending into a per-person funding cap, which also would result in less federal funding for states over time.
  • Allows states to waive many of the ACA's consumer protections, like its essential health benefits and the requirement that insurers charge sick and healthy people the same premium.

Go deeper

U.S. grants temporary protected status to thousands of Venezuelans

Venezuelan citizens participate in the vote for the popular consultation in December 2020, as part of a protest against Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in Doral, Florida. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP

Venezuelans living in the United States will be eligible to receive temporary protected status for 18 months, the Department of Homeland Security announced Monday.

Why it matters: Tens of thousands of Venezuelans have fled to the U.S. amid economic, political and social turmoil back home. Former President Trump, on his last full day in office, granted some protections to Venezuelans through the U.S. Deferred Enforced Departure program, but advocates and lawmakers said the move didn't go far enough.

"She-cession" threatens economic recovery

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Decades of the slow economic progress women made catching up to men evaporated in just one year.

Why it matters: As quickly as those gains were erased, it could take much, much longer for them to return — a warning Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen issued today.

The Week America Changed

Sandberg thought Zuckerberg was "nuts" on remote work in January 2020

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Image

Chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg thought Mark Zuckerberg was "nuts" when he raised the possibility in January 2020 that 50,000 Facebook employees might have to work from home. By March 6, they were.

Why it matters: In an interview Monday with Axios Re:Cap, Sandberg explained how Facebook moved quickly to respond to the pandemic with grants for small businesses and work-from-home stipends for its employees, and how the company has been watching the unfolding crisis for women in the workforce.