Sanders at the podium. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said President Trump "hasn't back away from" some of the school safety proposals he initially made, such as raising the purchase age for certain weapons, though his plan — unveiled yesterday — excludes such actions opposed by the NRA.

"Is there anything [in Trump's school safety plan] that the NRA opposes?," ABC's Jon Karl asked. Sanders said that increasing the age to purchase assault-style rifles to 21 "will be reviewed."

Highlights:

  • On the attack against an ex-spy in the U.K., which British PM Theresa May said was "likely" perpetrated by Russians: "Outrage ... reckless ... irresponsible ... We stand by our closest ally in the special relationship we have... We are ready if we can be of any assistance." Notable: Sanders didn't say "Russia."
  • Trump will make his first trip to Latin America, with a stop in Lima, Peru, next month.
  • White House "fully expects" the meeting between Trump and Kim Jong-un will happen. “North Korea made several promises and we hope they stick to those promises and if so, the meeting will go on as planned," Sanders said.

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