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White House: Trump "hasn't backed away from" raising gun purchase age

Sanders at the podium. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said President Trump "hasn't back away from" some of the school safety proposals he initially made, such as raising the purchase age for certain weapons, though his plan — unveiled yesterday — excludes such actions opposed by the NRA.

"Is there anything [in Trump's school safety plan] that the NRA opposes?," ABC's Jon Karl asked. Sanders said that increasing the age to purchase assault-style rifles to 21 "will be reviewed."


  • On the attack against an ex-spy in the U.K., which British PM Theresa May said was "likely" perpetrated by Russians: "Outrage ... reckless ... irresponsible ... We stand by our closest ally in the special relationship we have... We are ready if we can be of any assistance." Notable: Sanders didn't say "Russia."
  • Trump will make his first trip to Latin America, with a stop in Lima, Peru, next month.
  • White House "fully expects" the meeting between Trump and Kim Jong-un will happen. “North Korea made several promises and we hope they stick to those promises and if so, the meeting will go on as planned," Sanders said.
Jonathan Swan 6 hours ago
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Trump's two-front war

Photo: Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump is ending the week with a flop — nowhere close to the border wall funding he wanted in the DACA-less spending bill that congressional leaders released last evening. But he's fulfilling one of his most aggressive campaign promises with his anti-China trade action.

The big picture: Trump's expected announcement today of tariffs on Chinese imports is a big deal, and analysts fear it could provoke a trade war — and it comes as Trump has been battling his own party here at home over the government spending bill.

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The worst flu season in eight years

Note: Activity levels are based on outpatient visits in a state compared to the average number of visits that occur during weeks with little or no flu virus circulation; Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

This year's flu season caught many experts off guard with both its sustained prevalence and its virulence. At its peak, there was a higher level of flu-like illnesses reported than any other year during the past eight years. Watch in the visual as it hits its peak around Week 18.

Why it matters: Public health officials try to capture this data when developing the next year's vaccines. And, of course, they want to find better ways to prevent severe flu seasons. There's a "Strategic Plan" to develop a universal vaccine to protect against a wider range of influenza viruses, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, tells Axios.