SaveSave story

White House security clearance changes could affect Kushner's job

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jared Kushner's job as senior adviser to the president could be affected as early as next week by Chief of Staff John Kelly's new security clearance policies, Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Kushner has been able to access sensitive national security information that very few people have access to, despite operating on an interim security clearance for the last year. A senior administration official told the Post that Kelly's new plan puts a "bull's eye" on Kushner.

Kelly plans to revoke high-level access from those working on an interim security clearance, which means Kushner might not be able to access the sensitive information he does now. Kushner currently attends classified briefings, reads the daily intelligence briefing, oversees strategies for Middle East peace, and meets with foreign officials around the world.

That could all change, according to a senior administration official who spoke with the Post. The official said that Kelly "has been frustrated" with Kushner’s level of access and that he understands his new plan could make it difficult for Kushner to maintain his current role the way it is.

  • One of Kushner's attorneys, Abbe Lowell, told the Post that Kelly’s plan “will not affect Mr. Kushner’s ability to continue to do the very important work he has been assigned by the president.”

Why it matters: Kushner isn't expected to get permanent security clearance any time soon, per two U.S. officials who spoke to WashPost. And the White House has dozens of employees working on an interim security clearance.

Go deeper: Read Kelly's plan for overhauling the security clearance process.

SaveSave story

Zuckerberg admits Facebook "breach of trust"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks wearing a t-shirt, with trees behind him
Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg weighed in on what he called the "Cambridge Analytica situation" today in a Facebook post, saying there was a "a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that."

Why it matters: Facebook has been under extraordinary pressure from lawmakers, regulators and Wall Street to respond to the issue.

Haley Britzky 21 mins ago
SaveSave story

Authorities find "confession" from Austin bombing suspect

Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb.
Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb. Photo: Suzanne Cordeiro / AFP / Getty Images

Brian Manley, interim police chief in Austin, Texas, said on Wednesday that authorities found "a 25-minute 'confession'" on Mark Conditt's phone, the Austin bombing suspect, per the Washington Post.

The details: Per Manley, Conditt did not mention terrorism or hatred as his motivation; the phone recording seemed to be "the outcry of a very challenged young man, talking about challenges in his personal life, that led him to this point." Conditt also mentioned all known explosive devices, per the Post.