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Jared Kushner's job as senior adviser to the president could be affected as early as next week by Chief of Staff John Kelly's new security clearance policies, Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Kushner has been able to access sensitive national security information that very few people have access to, despite operating on an interim security clearance for the last year. A senior administration official told the Post that Kelly's new plan puts a "bull's eye" on Kushner.

Kelly plans to revoke high-level access from those working on an interim security clearance, which means Kushner might not be able to access the sensitive information he does now. Kushner currently attends classified briefings, reads the daily intelligence briefing, oversees strategies for Middle East peace, and meets with foreign officials around the world.

That could all change, according to a senior administration official who spoke with the Post. The official said that Kelly "has been frustrated" with Kushner’s level of access and that he understands his new plan could make it difficult for Kushner to maintain his current role the way it is.

  • One of Kushner's attorneys, Abbe Lowell, told the Post that Kelly’s plan “will not affect Mr. Kushner’s ability to continue to do the very important work he has been assigned by the president.”

Why it matters: Kushner isn't expected to get permanent security clearance any time soon, per two U.S. officials who spoke to WashPost. And the White House has dozens of employees working on an interim security clearance.

Go deeper: Read Kelly's plan for overhauling the security clearance process.

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McConnell: Confirming Amy Coney Barrett will help GOP retain Senate

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) expressed no regrets about Judge Amy Coney Barrett's controversial confirmation, telling Politico in an interview that he believes the decision to place her on the Supreme Court just a week before the election will help Republicans retain the Senate.

Why it matters: With a week to go until Election Day, many Republicans are concerned that President Trump's unpopularity could cost them the Senate. McConnell has long viewed the transformation of the federal judiciary through the confirmation of young conservative judges as his defining legacy.

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Democrats sound alarm on mail-in votes

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Driving the news: Wisconsin Democrats and the Democratic secretary of state of Michigan are urging voters to return absentee ballots to election clerks’ offices or drop boxes. They are warning that the USPS may not be able to deliver ballots by the Election Day deadline.