Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jared Kushner's job as senior adviser to the president could be affected as early as next week by Chief of Staff John Kelly's new security clearance policies, Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Kushner has been able to access sensitive national security information that very few people have access to, despite operating on an interim security clearance for the last year. A senior administration official told the Post that Kelly's new plan puts a "bull's eye" on Kushner.

Kelly plans to revoke high-level access from those working on an interim security clearance, which means Kushner might not be able to access the sensitive information he does now. Kushner currently attends classified briefings, reads the daily intelligence briefing, oversees strategies for Middle East peace, and meets with foreign officials around the world.

That could all change, according to a senior administration official who spoke with the Post. The official said that Kelly "has been frustrated" with Kushner’s level of access and that he understands his new plan could make it difficult for Kushner to maintain his current role the way it is.

  • One of Kushner's attorneys, Abbe Lowell, told the Post that Kelly’s plan “will not affect Mr. Kushner’s ability to continue to do the very important work he has been assigned by the president.”

Why it matters: Kushner isn't expected to get permanent security clearance any time soon, per two U.S. officials who spoke to WashPost. And the White House has dozens of employees working on an interim security clearance.

Go deeper: Read Kelly's plan for overhauling the security clearance process.

Go deeper

13 mins ago - Health

At least 48 local public health leaders have quit or been fired during pandemic

Former California public health director Dr. Sonia Angell on Feb. 27 in Sacramento, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

At least 48 local and state-level public health leaders have retired, resigned or been fired across 23 states since April, according to a review by the AP and Kaiser Health News.

Driving the news: California public health director Dr. Sonia Angell resigned on Sunday without explanation, a few days after the state fixed a delay in reporting coronavirus test results that had affected reopenings for schools and businesses, AP reports.

House will not hold votes until Sept. 14 unless stimulus deal is reached

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) announced Monday that the House will not hold any floor votes until Sept. 14, though members will remain on 24-hour notice to return to Washington in case a deal on coronavirus stimulus is reached.

Why it matters: Democrats and the Trump administration remain deadlocked and have not met since negotiations broke down without a deal on Friday.

Updated 56 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 19,936,547 — Total deaths: 732,467 — Total recoveries — 12,144,510Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 5,063,770 — Total deaths: 163,156 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Business: Richer Americans are more comfortable eating out.
  4. Public health: How America can do smarter testing.
  5. Sports: The cost of kids losing gym class — College football is on the brink.
  6. World: Europe's CDC recommends new restrictions amid "true resurgence in cases."