Oct 3, 2018

White House responds to NYT report on alleged Trump tax fraud

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders lambasted a bombshell New York Times investigation on Tuesday that explained how Donald Trump raked in millions from tax dodges, arguing that the publication has been largely focused on “attacking the president and his family 24/7 instead of reporting the news.”

The details: The Times reports said Trump participated in "dubious" tax schemes in the 1990s and received at least $413 million in today’s dollars from his father's real estate empire. Sanders, in a statement, characterized the report as a "misleading attack against the Trump family," adding that the “Times can rarely find anything positive about the President and his tremendous record of success to report.”

“Fred Trump has been gone for nearly twenty years and it’s sad to witness this misleading attack against the Trump family by the failing New York Times. Many decades ago the IRS reviewed and signed off on these transactions. The New York Times’ and other media outlets‘ credibility with the American people is at an all time low because they are consumed with attacking the president and his family 24/7 instead of reporting the news. The truth is the market is at an all-time high, unemployment is at a fifty year low, taxes for families and businesses have been cut, wages are up, farmers and workers are empowered from better trade deals, and America’s military is stronger than ever, yet the New York Times can rarely find anything positive about the President and his tremendous record of success to report. Perhaps another apology from the New York Times, like the one they had to issue after they got the 2016 election so embarrassingly wrong, is in order.”
— Sanders said.

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