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A border patrol car between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, April 7, 2018. Photo: Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images

The White House asked Congress for $4.5 billion in emergency funding on Wednesday to manage what it describes as a record number of migrants attempting to enter the southern border, Politico reports.

The impact: “In the worst-case scenario, thousands of children might remain for lengthy periods of time in facilities that were never intended to be long-term shelters, rather than being expeditiously transferred to HHS custody,” White House acting budget director Russ Vought wrote in his budget request, per Politico.

Details: Citing a "humanitarian and security crisis," the request includes $3.3 billion for humanitarian assistance and $1.1 billion for border operations, per the Washington Post. That would be in addition to the $8 billion that President Trump requested to build a wall on the southern border, which involved obtaining $3.6 billion through his national emergency declaration.

The other side: Democrats will likely condemn this multibillion-dollar ask, as they attempt to block Trump’s separate initiative to shift more government funds toward building a border wall.

Go deeper: Immigration brings out Trump's most radical self

Go deeper

Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is expected to sign 15 executive actions upon taking office Wednesday, immediately reversing key Trump administration policies.

Why it matters: The 15 actions — aimed at issues like climate change and immigration — mark more drastic immediate steps compared with the two day-one actions from Biden's four predecessors combined, according to incoming White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.