Senior Counselor Kellyanne Conway said Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore's "conduct as described should disqualify" him — if true.

  • Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to CNN's Jake Tapper: "People should investigate this issue and get the facts. It appears there's a significant issue here that needs to be addressed"
  • Legislative Director Marc Short to NBC's Chuck Todd: "No Senate seat is more important than the issue of child pedophilia, but, having said that, he has not been proven guilty. We have to afford him the chance to defend himself."

Conway said she's "gone farther" than Trump and other Republican leaders — many of whom said Moore should step down if the accusations are true. "I've reflected something the Vice President said as well which is, everybody should know that conduct is disqualifying," Conway said to Martha Raddatz on ABC's This Week.

Yes, but: While Republican leaders have repeatedly said that Moore should step aside if the allegations against him are true, none have specified what would need to happen for them to discern that they are true. Moore's accusers have spoken on the record, and the candidate has denied their claims. The election in Alabama is four weeks away.

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Updated 54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic" — COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear them — America was sick well before it ever got COVID-19U.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for 2nd straight day.
  3. World: Spain declares new state of emergency — Polish President Andrzej Duda tests positive for COVID-19.

Senate advances Amy Coney Barrett nomination, setting up final confirmation vote

Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

The Senate voted 51-48 on Sunday to advance the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, setting up a final confirmation vote for Monday.

Why it matters: It's now virtually inevitable that the Senate will vote to confirm President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee before the election, which is just nine days away.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street is living up to its bad reputation

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Recent headlines will have you convinced that Wall Street is hell-bent on living up to all of its stereotypes.

Driving the news: Goldman Sachs is the biggest and the boldest, paying more than $5 billion in fines in the wake of the 1MDB scandal, in which billions were stolen from the people of Malaysia.