SaveSave story

The White House's immigration proposal is dead on arrival

Stephen Miller at the White House podium
Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The White House framework on immigration reform that came out yesterday is a non-starter for influential figures on the left and right.

But, but, but: A senior White House official pushed back at our reporting, noting only President Trump or a member of congressional leadership can stop a bill in its tracks.

Put simply: Stephen Miller is dangling out a DACA amnesty in exchange for more wall funding — which sounds very generous to the uninitiated. But how will this get 60 votes?

Pushback from the right:

  • Roy Beck of NumbersUSA, a group that wants to lower immigration levels: "The plan seems eerily similar to the blueprint used for the 2007 Bush-Kennedy amnesty..."
    • "Even if new applications for chain migration categories are stopped immediately, the framework would allow chain migration to continue for decades by allowing all of the four million foreigners in the waiting list to continue coming."
  • Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies: "By specifically saying that 1.8M 'dreamers' would get amnesty, WH proposal guarantees that as a *floor*; the number in any bill that actually passes will inevitably be higher."

Pushback from the left:

  • The price is way too high for Democrats. The wall funding is way, way too high at $25 billion. A number closer to $10 billion is more realistic.
  • The larger problems: The increase of ICE agents, faster deportations, stronger interior enforcement and the massive cuts to legal immigration by eliminating extended family migration.
  • The bottom line: Two progressive immigration leaders who’ve analyzed the proposal believe it could lead to reductions of 40-50% in legal immigration — the biggest reductions since the 1920s.

Editor's Note: This post has been updated to add more information.

SaveSave story

Why Trump added a streetfighter to his legal team

Screenshot via Fox News

A new addition to President Trump's legal team — Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who is well-known in Washington and has argued for the president on Fox News — reflects three White House realities.

The state of play: (1) The White House is digging in for a fight that looks to be longer and messier than officials had expected. (2) This is another example of the president responding to televised cues. Trump has spent most of his adult life in litigation, and obsesses about legal positioning in the same way that he is consumed by his press coverage. (3) It's another pugilistic voice at the table, and suggests that this weekend's attacks on Mueller won't be the last.

SaveSave story

Facebook reaches a tipping point

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios 

Of all the news crises Facebook has faced during the past year, the Cambridge Analytica scandal is playing out to be the worst and most damaging.

Why it matters: It's not that the reports reveal anything particularly new about how Facebook's back end works — developers have understood the vulnerabilities of Facebook's interface for years. But stakeholders crucial to the company's success — as well as the public seem less willing to listen to its side of the story this time around.