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Photo courtesy of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

The White House has launched a new website, AI.gov, to make artificial intelligence research more accessible across the nation, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The U.S. once led significantly in the global artificial intelligence race, but now risks being overtaken by China. This is one step the White House is taking to drum up excitement for AI and broaden educational opportunities in the field.

What’s on the site: The website's target audience is the general public, and its purpose is to make public information available on AI more visible to someone like a teacher or student interested in science.

  • Users will be able to visit the website to learn how artificial intelligence is being used across the nation in a variety of ways, including to respond to the COVID pandemic and weather forecasting, for example.

It’s also meant to be a tool to advance research.

  • “This is a resource that will enable researchers from all over the country to have access to both the computing and the data that they need in order to do cutting edge research,” Lynne Parker, director of the National Artificial Intelligence Initiative Office, told Axios.

In its intent to promote equity in the science space, the site will also have a portal designed to provide information on scholarship or fellowship programs, so that potential students interested in AI can learn how to get help paying for their studies.

  • The site will be run by the National Artificial Intelligence Initiative Office within the White House, an office that was created last year by Congress.

Go deeper

Exclusive: Will Hurd joins OpenAI's board of directors

Will Hurd. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former Rep. Will Hurd (R-Texas) is joining the board of OpenAI, an artificial intelligence research lab that counted Elon Musk as a co-founder, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: Hurd is a former undercover CIA operative who's long focused on artificial intelligence issues in and out of Congress. He's been widely quoted since leaving Congress for his moderate perspectives and criticism of former President Trump.

Tina Reed, author of Vitals
2 hours ago - Health

Gottlieb: CDC hampered U.S. response to COVID

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

The CDC moved too slowly at several points in the coronavirus pandemic, ultimately hindering the U.S. response, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb writes in a new book, Uncontrolled Spread.

The big picture: The book argues that American intelligence agencies should have a much bigger role in pandemic preparedness, even if that's sometimes at the expense of public health agencies like the CDC.

911's digital makeover

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A next-generation 911 would allow the nation's 6,000 911 centers to accept texts, videos and photos.

The big picture: U.S. emergency communications have remained stubbornly analog, but Congress is about to take another run at dragging 911 into the digital age.