Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Donald Trump during his address to a joint session of Congress last February. Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The special guests for President Trump's first State of the Union address will be seated with the First Lady and range from the parents of teenage girls murdered by MS-13 to the first blind double amputee to reenlist in the Marine Corps after being wounded at war.

Why it matters: As Jonathan Swan pointed out in his Sneak Peek newsletter Sunday, the most moving part of Trump's speech to Congress last February was when he spoke directly to the widow of Navy SEAL William "Ryan" Owens, who was seated in the House gallery. The moment resulted in a two-minute standing ovation. Look for a similar show tomorrow night.

The White House's special guests:

  • Corey Adams, a skilled welder at Staub Manufacturing Solutions in Dayton, Ohio became a first-time homeowner in 2017. Adams and his wife will invest their extra money from tax reform into their two daughters’ education savings.
  • Elizabeth Alvarado, Robert Mickens, Evelyn Rodriguez and Freddy Cuevas are the parents of Nisa Mickens and Kayla Cuevas, who were murdered by MS-13 in 2016.
  • Corporal Matthew Bradford (Ret.) joined the U.S. Marine Corps out of high school and deployed to Iraq in 2006. In 2007, he stepped on an improvised explosive device that left him blind and took both of his legs. After multiple surgeries and therapy, Matthew reenlisted in the Marine Corps – the first blind, double amputee to do so.
  • Jon Bridgers founded the Cajun Navy, a non-profit rescue and recovery organization to respond to flooding in south Louisiana. In 2017, the Cajun Navy helped provide aid to those in Texas affected by Hurricane Harvey.
  • David Dahlberg, a fire prevention technician in southern California saved 62 children and staff members from a raging wildfire that had encircled their camp in July 2017.
    Officer Ryan Holets from Albuquerque, New Mexico, and his wife adopted a baby from parents who suffered from opioid addiction.
  • Ashlee Leppert, an aviation electronics technician in the U.S. Coast Guard rescued dozens of Americans during the 2017 hurricane season.
  • Agent Celestino “CJ” Martinez, a Supervisory Special Agent for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations unit, has spent much of his 15-year tenure working to dismantle transnational criminal organizations. His investigations have led to more than 100 arrests of MS-13 gang members.
  • Staff Sergeant Justin Peck, who served in the U.S. Army for eight years, helped clear IEDs from territory previously controlled by ISIS in Syria. During on mission, he saved a colleague's life by going into an uncleared, IED-ridden room and applying a tourniquet, placing an endotracheal tube and conducting CPR.
  • Preston Sharp has organized the placement of more than 40,000 American flags and red carnations on soldiers’ graves as part of his goal to honor veterans in all 50 states.
  • Siblings Steve Staub and Sandy Keplinger started Staub Manufacturing Solutions, a contract manufacturing company specializing in metal fabrication, twenty years ago. 'Thanks to the 'Trump bump" in their business, Staub Manufacturing Solutions has seen an uptick in sales, employment, and optimism," the White House writes. "Following enactment of the tax cuts and reform legislation last year, they were able to give all their employees larger than expected Christmas bonuses."

Go deeper

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

1 hour ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!