Sen. Dick Durbin and President Trump. Photo: Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

Since the report broke on Thursday that President Trump referred to Haiti and African nations as "shithole countries," there have been conflicting reports from the lawmakers who were in the room.

The bottom line: This is a straightforward question about a meeting that happened just a few days ago, yet some participants seem to have forgotten what was said remarkably quickly. Meanwhile, Sen. Dick Durbin told the press that Trump made such remarks "repeatedly," while Sen. David Perdue denies the account entirely.

Deny
  • President Donald Trump: "The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used."
  • Sen. David Perdue: "I'm telling you he did not use that word...and I'm telling you it's a gross misrepresentation." Perdue had previously said he couldn't recall.
Can't recall
Confirm
  • Sen. Dick Durbin: "You've seen the comments in the press, I've not read one of them that's inaccurate ... He said these hate-filled things and he said them repeatedly."
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham: "Following comments by the president, I said my piece directly to him yesterday. The president and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel."
    • It's also been reported that Graham told Sen. Tim Scott that reports of Trump's remarks are "basically accurate."
Won't comment
  • Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart: "Nothing will divert my focus to stop the deportation of these innocent people whose futures are at stake."
  • Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy hasn't commented.
  • Rep. Bob Goodlatte hasn't commented.

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Go deeper

Los Angeles and San Diego public schools will be online only this fall

Alhambra Unified School District. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Public schools in Los Angeles and San Diego, the two largest public school districts in California, will not be sending children back to campuses in the fall and will instead administer online classes only due to concerns over the ongoing threat of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: The two districts, which together enroll about 825,000 students, are the largest in the country thus far to announce that they will not return to in-person learning in the fall, even as the Trump administration aggressively pushes for schools to do so.

Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 12,984,811 — Total deaths: 570,375 — Total recoveries — 7,154,492Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 3,327,388— Total deaths: 135,379 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. World: WHO head: There will be no return to the "old normal" for the foreseeable future — Hong Kong Disneyland closing due to surge.
  4. States: Cuomo says New York will use formula to determine if reopening schools is safe.
  5. Politics: Mick Mulvaney: "We still have a testing problem in this country."

Cuomo: New York will use formula to determine if it's safe to reopen schools

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that schools will only reopen if they meet scientific criteria that show the coronavirus is under control in their region, including a daily infection rate of below 5% over a 14-day average. "We're not going to use our children as guinea pigs," he added.

The big picture: Cuomo's insistence that New York will rely on data to decide whether to reopen schools comes as President Trump and his administration continue an aggressive push to get kids back in the classroom as part of their efforts to juice the economy.