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(Alex Brandon / AP)

A bipartisan group of governors this morning seemed to reinforce the Senate HELP Committee's emerging consensus about how to stabilize the Affordable Care Act. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, both Democrats (and, incidentally, both mentioned as possible presidential candidates in 2020), endorsed a slate of policy proposals roughly in line with that the committee is already considering.

What Bullock said: Governors all agree the following things need to be done to stabilize the market:

  • Insurer's cost-sharing subsidies need to be paid
  • Some kind of temporary stability fund (like reinsurance) should be implemented
  • A mix of healthy and unhealthy people need to participate in the market
  • States want to be able to innovate while also maintaining consumer protections

Reinsurance: One ongoing point of debate: Whether the federal government should fund some sort of reinsurance program, which would help insurers cover the costs of their most expensive customers. Governors from both parties said this morning they believe they could ultimately take over such a program themselves — both the financing and the administration — if the federal government gets it started.HELP Chairman Lamar Alexander said the committee needs to "think about what the state share" of funding for a reinsurance program or high-risk pool should be. He has questioned whether this bill, which he's hoping to put together before the end of the month, is the right vehicle for a new reinsurance program.Where the Senate stands: Alexander started off today's session with governors by recapping yesterday's hearing with state insurance commissioners. At yesterday's hearing, "I heard three things mostly: addressing high-cost individuals through reinsurance or some other model, continuing the cost sharing reduction payments, and more flexibility for states in the law's 1332 waivers," Alexander said.

He then gave more details about what he's looking at:

  • Allowing less comprehensive "copper" plans, currently available only to people younger than 30, to be purchased by people older than 30
  • Funding cost sharing subsidies for some period of time

He also outlined several potential changes to the process by which states can seek "innovation waivers" for their own markets:

  • Reducing the six-month waiting period for waiver approval
  • Allowing "copycat" applications to be quickly approved, which would make it easier for one state to adopt another state's model
  • Allowing governors or insurance commissioners to apply for waivers, instead of requiring state legislatures to approve those applications
  • Said he was "intrigued" by finding a new way to calculate waivers' budgetary impacts
  • Looking at whether there's a way to combine the individual market innovation waivers with state Medicaid waivers, so that savings could be shared between the two systems

Go deeper

Updated 38 mins ago - Sports

Katie Ledecky wins gold in first women's 1500m freestyle

Team USA's Katie Ledecky celebrates after winning the final of the women's 1,500m freestyle swimming event during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre in Tokyo on Wednesday. Photo: Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images)

Katie Ledecky took home the Olympic gold medal in the women's 1,500-meter freestyle swimming race Tuesday evening, becoming the first female swimmer to win the newly added division. Team USA's Erica Sullivan won silver.

Of note: The Tokyo Games mark the first time that the long-distance race has been open to women, and Ledecky paid tribute to her predecessors after the race. "I just think of all the great U.S. swimmers who didn’t have a chance to swim that event," she said on NBC.

Updated 48 mins ago - Sports

Olympics dashboard

Katie Ledecky celebrates with teammate Erica Sullivan after winning the women’s 1500m freestyle final. Photo: Tom Pennington/Getty Images

🚨: Katie Ledecky wins gold in first women's 1500m freestyle

🤸🏾‍♀️: Simone Biles pulls out of gymnastics team finals, citing her mental health

🎾: "This one sucks more than the others," Naomi Osaka says on upset loss

⚽️: USA women's soccer ties Australia, propelling them to the quarterfinals

🏊‍♀️: Teen swimmer Lydia Jacoby wins first U.S. women's Tokyo Games gold

👟: World Athletics president supports reviewing marijuana rules in doping

🏄‍♀️: American Carissa Moore wins first-ever women's Olympic gold in surfing

Go deeper: Full Axios coverage - Medal tracker

Activision Blizzard CEO calls company's response to suit "tone deaf"

Photo: Bloomberg/ Getty Images

Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick sent a lengthy letter to employees late on Tuesday, listing steps the company will take to address widespread allegations of sexist and discriminatory conduct at the "Call of Duty" and "World of Warcraft" gaming company.

Why it matters: This was the most comprehensive message from the company, and a softer one than had been sent by Kotick's PR people and a top executive last week.