Jul 21, 2017

What to know about Anthony Scaramucci

AP

Today, Anthony Scaramucci was appointed as director of communications and Sean Spicer resigned. Here's some fast facts about "Mooch":

  • In June, he suggested that the White House broadcast their own daily newscast from a desk on the White House lawn, according to the Washington Post.
  • He graduated from Harvard Law School and got his undergrad in Economics at Tufts University.
  • He has worked at Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs and Neuberger Berman.
  • He co-founded Oscar Capital Management, which sold to Neuberger Berman in 2001.
  • He founded the hedge fund SkyBridge Capital in 2005, which now has $11.4 billion in assets under management. He has hosted major financial industry conferences (SALT conferences). This past spring's speakers included Joe Biden.
  • He once hung an expensive Superman painting in his office, his former employees told the Post.
  • He was named the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year in 2011.
  • He was a host of "Wall Street Week" and has been a contributor for Fox News.
  • He's written three books: "The Little Book of Hedge Funds," "Goodbye Gordon Gekko" and "Hopping Over the Rabbit Hole."
  • During the last campaign season, he worked first for Scott Walker and then Jeb Bush's campaigns before joining Trump. He even called Trump "another hack politician" in 2015 on Fox.
  • Last November, he joined Trump's Presidential Transition Team Executive Committee.
  • Last month, three CNN journalist resigned after publishing an unverified story connecting Scaramucci to a Russian investment fund.
  • This is the third job offered to Scaramucci in the Trump administration — director of the Office of Public Engagement, a senior role in the U.S. Export-Import Bank — which he accepted — and now director of communications.

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