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CPAs, lawyers and financial advisers tell Bloomberg personal-finance writer Ben Steverman that they are still trying to sort out the new law's financial consequences for major life decisions:

  • Estate planning: "Starting in 2018, single people who die with about $11 million would not be subject to the estate tax, up from $5.5 million. Married couples can shield about $22 million from estate and gift taxes. ... The higher thresholds expire in 2026."
  • David Scott Sloan, co-chair of global private wealth services at Holland & Knight in Boston: "We're lining up appointments for January because of the tax-free gifting opportunities."
  • Business ownership: "The pass-through deduction could also create an incentive for more workers to quit their jobs and become independent contractors. But the law also could complicate the taxes of many Americans who are self-employed now, including so-called gig economy workers such as Uber drivers."
  • Marriage: "Under current law, many two-income couples end up paying more in taxes by getting married. The law eliminates that marriage penalty for couples making less than a combined $600,000.""But be advised: Those individual tax-rate changes are set to end in 2026 -- after that, your marriage might have to be just about love.

N.Y. Times Quote of the Day ... Paul J. Feiner, supervisor of the Town of Greenburgh in Westchester County, on a rush of property owners who want to prepay 2018 taxes to beat the $10,000 cap on deducting state, local and property taxes:

  • "I'm getting swamped with many, many calls, usually one an hour, from people who want to prepay their taxes."

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
24 mins ago - Economy & Business

How GameStop exposed the market

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Retail traders have found a cheat code for the stock market, and barring some major action from regulatory authorities or a massive turn in their favored companies, they're going to keep using it to score "tendies" and turn Wall Street on its head.

What's happening: The share prices of companies like GameStop are rocketing higher, based largely on the social media organizing of a 3-million strong group of Redditors who are eagerly piling into companies that big hedge funds are short selling, or betting will fall in price.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period from Feb. 15 to May 15, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.

2 hours ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools.