A Korean court approved an arrest warrant early Friday for Jay Y. Lee, the heir apparent to Korea's Samsung conglomerate. The move is part of a widening corruption scandal that has already caused the impeachment of Korean President Park Geun-hye. Prosecutors charge that Lee, 48, funneled millions of dollars to associates of Park in an effort to curry favor.

Déjà vu all over again: If this sounds familiar, it is. It's the second time that prosecutors have tried to secure a warrant against Lee. And Lee is also following in something of a family tradition. His father, Samsung chairman Lee Kun-hee, was convicted of bribery in 1996, and of tax evasion and breach of trust in 2009. He was pardoned both times, though, and avoided jail.

What it means: For Lee, it could imperil his efforts to succeed his father as head of the company. For Samsung, it's yet another distraction as the company's electronics unit tries to recover from last year's disastrous Galaxy Note 7 fiasco.

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Updated 34 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 11,514,395 — Total deaths: 535,453 — Total recoveries — 6,223,819Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 2,910,023 — Total deaths: 130,090 — Total recoveries: 906,763 — Total tested: 35,512,916Map.
  3. Public health: Case growth outpacing testing in hotspots
  4. States: Cuomo accuses Trump of "enabling" the coronavirus surge — West Virginia becomes latest state to mandate facial coverings.
  5. Politics: Meadows says Trump "is right" to claim 99% of coronavirus cases are "harmless."

Amy Cooper charged for calling police on Black bird-watcher in Central Park

A white woman who called 911 to accuse a Black man of threatening her life in Central Park in March faces misdemeanor charges for making a false report, the Manhattan District Attorney's office announced Monday.

The big picture: The May 25 incident, which was caught on film, was one of several viral episodes that helped catalyze massive Black Lives Matter protests against the police killings of Black people in the U.S.

McEnany defends Trump's tweet about Bubba Wallace and Confederate flag

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said during a press briefing Monday that President Trump "was not making a judgment one way or the other" about NASCAR's decision to ban the Confederate flag and that his attack on Bubba Wallace was an attempt to stand up for NASCAR fans who are unfairly painted as racist.

The state of play: McEnany was repeatedly grilled by reporters over the president's inflammatory tweet, in which he demanded that NASCAR's only Black driver apologize after the FBI determined that he was not a target of a hate crime and claimed that ratings had dropped after the sport banned the Confederate flag at its events.