Aug 22, 2017

Warning sign: Facebook teen-age use slips for first time ever

Facebook usage among 12 to 17-year-olds will decline for the first time this year, eMarketer estimates. Meanwhile, eMarketer's latest forecast for the first time has Snapchat beating both Instagram and Facebook in terms of total users aged 12 to 17 and 18 to 24.

Why it matters: This marks the first time eMarketer has ever predicted a decline in Facebook usage for any age group and usage among people 24 and younger will grow more slowly than previously forecast.

Data: eMarketer; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

  • "We see teens and tweens migrating to Snapchat and Instagram," says eMarketer forecasting analyst Oscar Orozco. "Both platforms have found success with this demographic since they are more aligned with how they communicate – using visual content."
  • "Outside of the Facebook-cutters, teens and tweens remaining on Facebook seem to be less engaged – logging in less frequently and spending less time on the platform. At the same time, we now have Facebook-nevers, many children aging into the tween demographic that appear to be overlooking Facebook altogether, yet still engaging with Facebook-owned Instagram."

Writing on the wall: Forbes headline from February: Facebook Users Posted A Third Less Content In 2016 Than In 2015.

Publishers take notice: BuzzFeed today Tuesday it will launch an all-new Snapchat Discover Publisher Stories for its Tasty and Nifty brands in early September. Both brands started as Facebook pages.

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Exclusive: Facebook adding part-time fact-checking contractors

Photo: Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Facebook is creating a new pilot program in the U.S. that will leverage part-time contracted "community reviewers" to expedite its fact-checking process.

The big picture: The community reviewers will help to corroborate or debunk stories that Facebook's machine learning tools flag as potential misinformation. This will make it easier for Facebook's fact-checking partners to quickly debunk false claims.

Go deeperArrowDec 17, 2019

Facebook won't stop letting politicians lie in ads

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Anyone who was waiting for Facebook to change its controversial political ad policies — particularly the one that allows politicians to lie with impunity — will have to keep waiting, the company made clear Thursday.

Driving the news: Facebook released a raft of small changes to its rules around political ads, including giving consumers the option to block political ads from their feeds.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Zuck's 2020 campaign

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday he's giving up setting annual challenges for himself and trying to take a longer view. But 2020 has already thrown down a challenge for him: threading a needle between business demands and political landmines.

The big picture: Zuckerberg has to grow revenue and users, yet not get blamed for tipping another election — and not buckle on what he views as the core value of free speech. Despite an onslaught of bad press, he seems to be succeeding ... for now.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020