Warner and Burr. Photo: Getty Images

U.S. lawmakers examining the role of social media in elections plan to meet with counterparts from the U.K. this week, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: It underscores the global nature of concerns about Big Tech.

The details: A Congressional aide familiar with the matter said that Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) and Vice Chairman Mark Warner (D-Va.) would meet with British Members of Parliament Damian Collins and Paul Farrelly, who are on the committee looking into social media platforms across the Atlantic. The huddle is set for this week on Capitol Hill.

Between the lines:

  • While the exact agenda for the meeting wasn't clear, all the lawmakers are involved with high-profile probes into the way disinformation spreads online.
  • Collins chairs the parliamentary Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee — of which Farrelly is a member. The committee is holding a hearing with representatives of Google, Facebook and Twitter this week in Washington as once aspect of a larger look at fake news.
  • Burr and Warner held a hearing with the companies in November as part of the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russian election interference.

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  6. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.

Over 73 million people watched the first debate on TV

Data: Nielsen; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

More than 73.1 million people watched the first presidential debate on television on Tuesday night, according to Nielsen ratings.

Why it matters: While that's a sizable audience for any American TV program, it's down more than 13% from the record number of TV viewers who tuned in for the first debate of the 2016 election. The chaotic nature of the debate and the overall uncertainty around this year's election may have pushed some viewers away.

Senate passes bill funding government through December

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Senate on Tuesday passed legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.

Where it stands: The legislation will avert a government shutdown before funding expires Wednesday night and before the Nov. 3 election. The House passed the same measure last week by a vote of 359-57 after House Democrats and the Trump administration agreed on the resolution.

  • Both sides agreed early in negotiations that the bill should be a "clean" continuing resolution — meaning each party would only make small changes to existing funding levels so the measure would pass through both chambers quickly, Axios' Alayna Treene reported last week. The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature.