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Afghan children alongside U.S. soldiers in 2009. Photo: TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP via Getty Images

At least 37 million people have been displaced as a result of wars fought by the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001 — more than from all conflicts since 1900 except for World War II, according to a report from Brown University out Tuesday.

The big picture: The U.S. is set to enter its 20th year of the war on terror, which began on Oct. 7, 2001, with the invasion of Afghanistan under the Bush administration.

  • The findings come as anti-refugee sentiments have grown in the U.S. and other Western countries, the New York Times notes.
  • The number of refugees and internally displaced people around the world has doubled between 2010 and 2019, according to the report.

Details: The report counts people who have been displaced in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, the Philippines, Libya and Syria. It doesn't include millions of people who were displaced in other countries where the U.S. has had smaller counterterrorism operations.

  • The report calls the figure "a very conservative estimate," adding that the real number of displaced people could be between 48 million to 59 million.
  • Zoom in: Somalia has seen 46% of its population displaced since American forces entered the country in 2002.

Worth noting: Some 25.3 million people have returned to their home countries or regions since the conflicts began.

What they're saying: “It tells us that U.S. involvement in these countries has been horrifically catastrophic, horrifically damaging in ways that I don’t think that most people in the United States, in many ways myself included, have grappled with or reckoned with in even the slightest terms," David Vine, an anthropology professor at American University and the lead author of the report, told the New York Times.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Nov 17, 2020 - World

Trump to cut troops in Afghanistan, but not to zero

Trump visits Afghanistan in 2019. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP vis Getty

Acting Secretary of Defense Christopher Miller announced on Tuesday that the U.S. would draw down its troop levels in both Afghanistan and Iraq to 2,500 by Jan. 15, 2021.

Why it matters: The U.S. currently has roughly 4,500 troops in Afghanistan, so this will be a significant reduction even as it falls short of President Trump's promise to end America's military presence there altogether.

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.