Jun 27, 2018

Wall Street stocks are getting crushed

It's been a strong year for the U.S. economy, but not for Wall Street stocks.

Bottom line: The nation's biggest banks have lost value in 2018, despite generally strong earnings, increased corporate merger activity, rising interest rates and all of them passing their first round of Federal Reserve "stress tests." There is no firm consensus on why it's happening, although higher U.S. Treasury yields are a popular culprit.

Data: Yahoo! Finance through market close yesterday; Chart: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

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S&P earnings expected to grow in Q4 for the first time since 2018

Reproduced from FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Given the way S&P 500 earnings have beaten estimates over the past few years it is likely the index will report earnings growth in the fourth quarter — the first and only quarter of growth last year.

Between the lines: John Butters, FactSet's senior earnings analyst, said in a note that on average nearly three-quarters of S&P 500 companies' actual earnings have exceeded estimates by about 5%.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Bank of England chief puts finishing touches on climate change legacy

Photo: Kirsty Wigglesworth/WPA Pool via Getty Images

With just a month left before he steps down as head of the Bank of England (BoE), Mark Carney is putting the finishing touches on his legacy at the British central bank.

Driving the news: The BoE laid out how it planned to test the resilience of the U.K.'s largest banks and insurers in increasingly threatening environmental scenarios. It’s a notable step for Carney who's "played a key role in highlighting financial risks from global warming," as Bloomberg notes.

Go deeperArrowDec 19, 2019

U.S. economy adds 145,000 jobs in final report of 2019

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. economy added 145,000 jobs in December, the government said on Friday, below economists’ expectations of 160,000. The unemployment rate held at 3.5% — a 50-year low — while wages grew 2.9% from a year earlier, the smallest gain since July 2018.

Why it matters: The U.S. job market held up in the final month of 2019, but heads into the election year with a slowing pace of job creation and wage growth.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020