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Virginia has removed its statue of confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the U.S. Capitol, Gov. Ralph Northam said Monday.

Why it maters: The move takes out a "symbol of Virginia’s racist and divisive history," Northam said. Each state can display two statues in the Capitol, and the statue of Lee has been in the building for 111 years as part of the commonwealth's contribution.

What he's saying: “We should all be proud of this important step forward for our Commonwealth and our country,” Northam said.

  • “The Confederacy is a symbol of Virginia’s racist and divisive history, and it is past time we tell our story with images of perseverance, diversity, and inclusion."

What's next: The statue will be replaced by a sculpture of civil rights icon Barbara Rose Johns, who battled against segregation as a teenager.

  • "I look forward to seeing a trailblazing young woman of color represent Virginia in the U.S. Capitol," Northam said, "where visitors will learn about Barbara Johns’ contributions to America and be empowered to create positive change in their communities just like she did.”

Go deeper: Confederate monuments become flashpoints in protests against racism

Go deeper

Capitol Police chief resigns amid pressure after mob breach

Capitol Police chief Steven Sund. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Capitol Police chief Steven Sund will resign next week, a spokesperson confirmed to Axios.

Driving the news: Sund's resignation, effective Jan. 16, comes amid pressure from lawmakers, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and the union representing the Capitol Police over the department's response to Wednesday's violent Capitol breach by a mob supporting President Trump.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.