Feb 7, 2020 - Health

Vaccine candidate for coronavirus on track for human trials in April

A scientist is at work in the VirPath university laboratory as they try to find an effective treatment against 2019-nCoV. Photo: Jeff Pachoud/AFP via Getty Images

The National Institutes of Health and biotech company Moderna, one of several companies working to develop treatment for the novel coronavirus, are on track for human clinical trials for a vaccine in two and half months, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director Anthony Fauci, said in a press briefing Friday.

Why it matters: If the trials prove effective, the vaccine could help protect people from future outbreaks. The researchers were able to successfully take the virus's genetic code and express proteins for animal trials. “I’m happy to tell you there are no glitches so far," Fauci said.

Go deeper: Billionaires and multinationals donate to fight coronavirus

Go deeper

Experimental coronavirus vaccine to be tested on humans

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The vaccine that the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and drugmaker Moderna have been developing to combat the coronavirus is ready to be tested on humans, NIAID director Anthony Fauci told the Wall Street Journal.

The state of play: The rapidly developed vaccine will be tested on 20–25 healthy volunteers in April to determine whether two doses will be safe and generate an immune response to protect against infection. Results will be available in July or August, Fauci told WSJ.

Go deeperArrowFeb 24, 2020 - Health

NIH has no big drug manufacturer on board to make its coronavirus vaccine

Anthony Fauci speaks at a Feb. 7 press conference on coronavirus developments. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A leading U.S. health official said Tuesday it's "very frustrating" that no major drug firm has yet offered to make a vaccine against the novel coronavirus that the National Institutes of Health is helping develop, STAT News reports.

Why it matters: When outbreaks of new worrisome pathogens start, governments may immediately start working on diagnostics, vaccines and treatments, but they also need a buy-in from drug companies that sometimes get burned if the outbreak suddenly peters out or the drug isn't successful.

Go deeperArrowFeb 12, 2020 - Health

Coronavirus vaccines in development aren't a short-term cure

Coronavirus under a microscope. Photo: BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images

There are a dozen research projects underway to try to come up with a vaccine for the Chinese coronavirus, Biocentury reports.

What's new: Drug maker Sanofi Pasteur is entering the race to develop a vaccine by partnering with the U.S. Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority — known as BARDA, the Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 18, 2020 - Health