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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on July 1. Photo: Manny Ceneta/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced visa restrictions on Tuesday for Chinese officials whom the Trump administration believes are restricting foreigners’ access to Tibet, limiting or eliminating those officials' ability to travel to the U.S., AP reports.

Why it matters: The travel ban comes as the U.S. rebukes China for its passage of a new security law which circumvents Hong Kong's independent legal system, for China's human rights abuses in the northwestern region of Xinjiang and global trade practices.

What they're saying: In a statement, Pompeo accused China of obstructing the travel of foreign diplomats, journalists and tourists to Tibet, an autonomous region of China, while Chinese visitors “enjoy far greater access to the United States.”

  • “Access to Tibetan areas is increasingly vital to regional stability, given the PRC’s human rights abuses there, as well as Beijing’s failure to prevent environmental degradation near the headwaters of Asia’s major rivers,” Pompeo said, according to AP.
  • He did not name who specifically would be impacted by the restrictions nor did he disclose how many officials will be affected.

Go deeper: A swift Hong Kong decoupling looms

Go deeper

Oct 13, 2020 - World

Chinese oligarch's company with ties to George W. Bush's brother plunges in value

Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

On Friday, shares of Hong Kong Finance Investment Holding Group Ltd. plummeted, Bloomberg reported. The company is involved in real estate and natural resources.

Why it matters: Neil Bush, the brother of former President George W. Bush, sits on the company's board as deputy chairman. Neil Bush's ties to Chinese-owned companies have drawn public scrutiny and once landed a super PAC supporting his brother Jeb Bush in hot water.

Trump's coronavirus adviser Scott Atlas resigns

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty

Scott Atlas, a controversial member of the White House coronavirus task force, handed in his resignation on Monday, according to three administration officials who discussed Atlas' resignation with Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump brought in Atlas as a counterpoint to NIAID director Anthony Fauci, whose warnings about the pandemic were dismissed by the Trump administration. With Trump now fixated on election fraud conspiracy theories, Atlas' detail comes to a natural end.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Assassination in Iran sets stage for tense final 50 days of Trump

The funeral ceremony in Tehran. Photo: Iranian Defense Ministry via Getty

Iranian leaders are weighing their response to the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, known as the father of Iran’s military nuclear program, who was given a state funeral Monday in Tehran.

The big picture: Iran has accused Israel of carrying out Friday’s attack, but senior leaders have suggested that they’ll choose patience over an immediate escalation that could play into the hands of the Israelis and the outgoing Trump administration.

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