Reproduced from Wood Mackenzie; Chart: Axios Visuals

The consultancy Wood Mackenzie has tallied how much U.S. oil producers are cutting back spending as the industry moves to crisis footing.

The big picture: What's already announced — from both independent producers and global giants like Chevron and BP — is eye-popping.

  • And there's more to come as companies deal with prices at their lowest levels in two decades due to coronavirus crushing demand and the Saudi-Russia price war.

Driving the news: "22 U.S. independents have cut investment for 2020 by a total of US$20 billion, an average of 35%, and three by 50% or more," they write.

  • Indeed, Devon Energy and Diamondback energy announced even further cuts this week.

Flashback: U.S. producers also cut back sharply when prices nosedived in the mid-2010s.

  • Wood Mackenzie notes that this time the spending cuts so far have been similar, but have arrived faster — and more are expected.
  • "[C]ompanies today are far leaner than back then; and what we’ve seen so far may just be a taste of what’s to come," they write.
  • They note that multiple rounds of spending reductions already announced by some companies are a sign that "further, deeper cuts" are coming for many U.S. independent producers.

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally that they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.