Eugene Kaspersky, founder of Kaspersky Lab, speaks at the 2018 Kaspersky Security Analyst Summit. Photo: Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images

Government officials are considering sanctions barring Kaspersky Lab from doing business in the U. S., CyberScoop reports.

Kaspersky's products have already been barred from federal systems as an alleged security risk, with reports the company's computer security software had been hijacked by Russian intelligence operatives to steal U.S. secrets. The company denies knowing involvement in any such scheme.

Why it matters: Barring Kaspersky Lab software from Federal computers is one thing, Barring the firm from doing business in the United States is significantly more onerous. Kaspersky's business in the United States declined after the reputational hit from the federal ban, but it still exists. The firm still employs American researchers in the U.S. and has an American headquarters in Massachusetts.

What Kaspersky is saying: “The continued actions by the U.S. government against Kaspersky Lab lack sufficient basis, have been taken without any evidence of wrongdoing by the company, and rely upon subjective, non-technical public sources, such as uncorroborated and often anonymously sourced media reports and rumors," Kaspersky Lab told Axios in a statement.

What lawmakers are saying: "The evidence of close ties and cooperation between Kaspersky Lab and the Kremlin is overwhelming, which is why I led efforts in Congress to rid Kaspersky products from federal systems," said Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) to reporters in a statement. "Sanctioning Kaspersky Lab is a logical next step."

Ties to the Kremlin: Kaspersky is Moscow-based. Its founder, Eugene Kaspersky, is accused of having close relationships with members of the Russian intelligence community, which he denies.

Rather than provide a specific allegation of wrongdoing against Kaspersky, the Trump administration said the ban was necessary because Russian laws would allow the Russian government to arbitrarily seize data sent to Kaspersky servers at any time. The company is currently challenging the ban in two court cases.

Correction: An earlier version of this article misstated Eugene Kaspersky's stance about alleged relationships with the Kremlin. He disputes them.

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
1 hour ago - Health

Rockefeller Foundation commits $1 billion for COVID-19 recovery

A health worker performs a COVID-19 test in New Delhi. Photo: Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

The Rockefeller Foundation announced on Monday that it will allocate $1 billion over the next three years to address the pandemic and its aftermath.

Why it matters: The mishandled pandemic and the effects of climate change threaten to reverse global progress and push more than 100 million people into poverty around the world. Governments and big NGOs need to ensure that the COVID-19 recovery reaches everyone who needs it.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — U.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. World: Italy tightens restrictions Spain declares new state of emergency.
  4. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine after possible COVID-19 exposure

Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine in COVID-19 precaution

A political display is posted on the outside of the Fox News headquarters on 6th Avenue in New York City in July. Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Fox News President Jay Wallace and anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum are among those recommended to get tested and quarantine after possible exposure to COVID-19, the New York Times first reported Sunday night.

The big picture: The Fox News contingent, which also included "The Five" show hosts Juan Williams and Dana Perino, were on a charter flight from Nashville to New York following Thursday's presidential debate with a person who later tested positive for the coronavirus.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!