Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Though the State Department has rejected requests from American embassies around the world to fly the rainbow pride flag for the month of June, officially recognized as LGBT Pride Month, a few embassies have found loopholes, reports the Washington Post.

Details: American embassies are still permitted to have rainbow flags on the premises, but not on the flagpole alongside the American flag, per NBC. The embassies in Israel, Germany, Brazil and Latvia are among those that have made the ask and been denied.

The state of play: Some embassies are still recognizing Pride Month by working around the policy:

  • The U.S. missions in Seoul, South Korea, and Chennai, India, have hung large pride flags on the sides of their buildings.
  • The embassy in New Delhi, India, hung rainbow-colored lights.
  • The U.S. Embassy in Chile's website has photos of a pride flag on its flagpole last month.
  • U.S. diplomats in Jerusalem joined marches for Pride and tolerance.

The big picture: President Trump has multiple policies that infringe on the rights of LGBTQ Americans, including banning transgender Americans from serving in the U.S. military. He also has plans to make it easier for adoption agencies to reject same-sex parents.

But, but, but: Trump, in a recent tweet, wrote: "As we celebrate LGBT Pride Month and recognize the outstanding contributions LGBT people have made to our great Nation, let us also stand in solidarity with the many LGBT people who live in dozens of countries worldwide that punish, imprison, or even execute individuals...."

Go deeper: Trump targets LGBTQ protections

Go deeper

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 12,859,834 — Total deaths: 567,123 — Total recoveries — 7,062,085Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 3,297,501— Total deaths: 135,155 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — NYC reports zero coronavirus deaths for first time since pandemic hit.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

Scoop: How the White House is trying to trap leakers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.

11 GOP congressional nominees support QAnon conspiracy

Lauren Boebert posing in her restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24. Photo: Emily Kask/AFP

At least 11 Republican congressional nominees have publicly supported or defended the QAnon conspiracy theory movement or some of its tenets — and more aligned with the movement may still find a way onto ballots this year.

Why it matters: Their progress shows how a fringe online forum built on unsubstantiated claims and flagged as a threat by the FBI is seeking a foothold in the U.S. political mainstream.